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5th Grade Rain Garden Design Challenge Handouts
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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These handouts accompany the 5th Grade Rain Garden Design Challenge Lesson Plan. The handouts give criteria for identifying areas of erosion and non-point source pollution entering waterways on school property, slope and soil suitability criteria for situating the rain garden, and data collection procedures for phosphate testing. The handouts also include guidelines and criteria for the final poster presentation design and Claim-Evidence-Reasoning, as well as rubrics for scoring and guidelines for peer feedback.

Subject:
Geology
Hydrology
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Environmental Science
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Formative Assessment
Interim/Summative Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Reference Material
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Amy Workman
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Acid-Base Solutions
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

How do strong and weak acids differ? Use lab tools on your computer to find out! Dip the paper or the probe into solution to measure the pH, or put in the electrodes to measure the conductivity. Then see how concentration and strength affect pH. Can a weak acid solution have the same pH as a strong acid solution?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Lancaster, Kelly
Loeblein, Patricia
Malley, Chris
Parson, Robert
Patricia Loeblein
Perkins, Kathy
PhET Interactive Simulations
Robert Parson
Date Added:
09/01/2010
All About Water!
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Educational Use
Rating

Students learn about the differences between types of water (surface and ground), as well as the differences between streams, rivers and lakes. Then, they learn about dissolved organic matter (DOM), and the role it plays in identifying drinking water sources. Finally, students are introduced to conventional drinking water treatment processes.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Jessica Ebert
Marissa H. Forbes
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Analytical Techniques for Studying Environmental and Geologic Samples, Spring 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This is a laboratory course supplemented by lectures that focus on selected analytical facilities that are commonly used to determine the mineralogy, elemental abundance and isotopic ratios of Sr and Pb in rocks, soils, sediments and water.

Subject:
Geology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bowring, Samuel
Boyle, Edward
Chatterjee, Nilanjan
Dudas, Francis
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Anchors Away
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Educational Use
Rating

In this activity, students discover the relationship between an object's mass and the amount of space it takes up (its volume). Students learn about the concept of displacement and how an object can float if it displaces enough water, and the concept of density and its relationship to mass and volume.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Adventure Engineering,
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Aquatic Chemistry, Fall 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This course details the quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. It includes a brief review of chemical thermodynamics that is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Moffett, Jim
Seewald, Jeff
Tivey, Meg
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Are Dams Forever?
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Educational Use
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Students learn that dams do not last forever. Similar to other human-made structures, such as roads and bridges, dams require regular maintenance and have a finite lifespan. Many dams built during the 1930-70s, an era of intensive dam construction, have an expected life of 50-100 years. Due to inadequate maintenance and/or for environmental reasons, some of these dams will fail or be removed in the next 50 years. The engineers with Splash Engineering have an ethical obligation to remind Thirsty County of the maintenance and lifespan concerns associated with its dam.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Jeff Lyng
Kristin Field
Date Added:
09/18/2014
An Arm and a Leg
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Educational Use
Rating

As an introduction to bioengineering, student teams are given the engineering challenge to design and build prototype artificial limbs using a simple syringe system and limited resources. As part of a NASA lunar mission scenario, they determine which substance, water (liquid) or air (gas), makes the appendages more efficient.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
K-12 Outreach Office,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Break the Tension
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Educational Use
Rating

Students learn about and experiment with the concept of surface tension. How can a paper clip "float" on top of water? How can a paper boat be powered by soap in water? How do water striders "walk" on top of water? Why do engineers care about surface tension? Students answer these questions as they investigate surface tension and surfactants.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Janet Yowell
Jay Shah
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Can You Catch the Water?
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Educational Use
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Students construct three-dimensional models of water catchment basins using everyday objects to form hills, mountains, valleys and water sources. They experiment to see where rain travels and collects, and survey water pathways to see how they can be altered by natural and human activities. Students discuss how engineers design structures that impact water collection, as well as systems that clean and distribute water.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Janet Yowell
Jay Shah
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Capillarity—Measuring Surface Tension
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Educational Use
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Students are presented with a short lesson on the difference between cohesive forces (the forces that hold water molecules together and create surface tension) and adhesive forces (the forces that causes water to "stick" to solid surfaces. The interaction between cohesive forces and adhesive forces causes the well-known capillary action. Students are also introduced to examples of capillary action found in nature and in our day-to-day lives.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Chuan-Hua Chen, Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University
Jean Stave, Durham Public Schools, NC
NSF CAREER Award and RET Program, Mechanical Engineering and Material Science,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Chromatography Lab
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Educational Use
Rating

To increase students' awareness of possible invisible pollutants in drinking water sources, students perform an exciting lab requiring them to think about how solutions and mixtures exist even in unsuspecting places such as ink. They use alcohol and chromatography paper to separate the components of black and colored marker ink. Students witness first-hand how components of a solution can be separated, even when those individual components are not visible in solution.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Barry Williams
GK-12 Program,
Jessica Ray
Phyllis Balcerzak
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Clean Energy: Hydropower
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Educational Use
Rating

Hydropower generation is introduced to students as a common purpose and benefit of constructing dams. Through an introduction to kinetic and potential energy, students come to understand how a dam creates electricity. They also learn the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Kristin Field
Michael Bendewald
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Clean Enough to Drink
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Students act as engineers contracted by NASA to create water filtration devices that clean visible particulates from teacher-prepared "dirty water." They learn about the worldwide need for potable water and gain appreciation for why water quality is an important issue for people on Earth as well as on the International Space Station. Working in groups, students experience the entire engineering design process, including a read-aloud book about the water cycle; a visiting water engineer presentation; their own online research about filter methods and designs; group brainstorming of designs (using ordinary household materials); filter construction and testing; redesign and retesting; lab book documentation of their notes, research, plans and results; and a summary poster presentation at a mini-engineering fair. Two design planning worksheets, a poster layout suggestion sheet and a grading rubric are provided.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Emily Sappington
Hanadi Rifai
Mary M. Revia
Mila Taylor
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs, University of Houston
Date Added:
10/13/2017
Dam Forces
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Educational Use
Rating

Students learn how the force of water helps determine the size and shape of dams. They use clay to build models of four types of dams, and observe the force of the water against each type. They conclude by deciding which type of dam they, as Splash Engineering engineers, will design for Thirsty County.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Kristin Field
Lauren Cooper
Megan Podlogar
Sara Born
Timothy M. Dittrich
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Dam Impacts
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Educational Use
Rating

While the creation of a dam provides many benefits, it can have negative impacts on local ecosystems. Students learn about the major environmental impacts of dams and the engineering solutions used to address them.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Kristin Field
Michael Bendewald
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Dams
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Educational Use
Rating

Through eight lessons, students are introduced to many facets of dams, including their basic components, the common types (all designed to resist strong forces), their primary benefits (electricity generation, water supply, flood control, irrigation, recreation), and their importance (historically, currently and globally). Through an introduction to kinetic and potential energy, students come to understand how dams generate electricity. They learn about the structure, function and purpose of locks, which involves an introduction to Pascal's law, water pressure and gravity. Other lessons introduce students to common environmental impacts of dams and the engineering approaches to address them. They learn about the life cycle of salmon and the many engineered dam structures that aid in their river passage, as they think of their own methods and devices that could help fish migrate past dams. Students learn how dams and reservoirs become part of the Earth's hydrologic cycle, focusing on the role of evaporation. To conclude, students learn that dams do not last forever; they require ongoing maintenance, occasionally fail or succumb to "old age," or are no longer needed, and are sometimes removed. Through associated hands-on activities, students track their personal water usage; use clay and plastic containers to model and test four types of dam structures; use paper cups and water to learn about water pressure and Pascal's Law; explore kinetic energy by creating their own experimental waterwheel from two-liter plastic bottles; collect and count a stream's insects to gauge its health; play an animated PowerPoint game to quiz their understanding of the salmon life cycle and fish ladders; run a weeklong experiment to measure water evaporation and graph their data; and research eight dams to find out and compare their original purposes, current status, reservoir capacity and lifespan. Woven throughout the unit is a continuing hypothetical scenario in which students act as consulting engineers with a Splash Engineering firm, assisting Thirsty County in designing a dam for Birdseye River.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
See individual lessons and activities.
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density Column Lab - Part 1
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Educational Use
Rating

In this first part of a two-part lab activity, students use triple balance beams and graduated cylinders to take measurements and calculate the densities of several common, irregularly shaped objects with the purpose to resolve confusion about mass and density. After this activity, conduct the associated Density Column Lab - Part 2 activity before presenting the associated Density & Miscibility lesson for discussion about concepts that explain what students have observed.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
GK-12 Program,
Jessica Ray, Phyllis Balcerzak, Barry Williams
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density Column Lab - Part 2
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Educational Use
Rating

Concluding a two-part lab activity, students use triple balance beams and graduated cylinders to take measurements and calculate densities of several household liquids and compare them to the densities of irregularly shaped objects (as determined in Part 1). Then they create density columns with the three liquids and four solid items to test their calculations and predictions of the different densities. Once their density columns are complete, students determine the effect of adding detergent to the columns. After this activity, present the associated Density & Miscibility lesson for a discussion about why the column layers do not mix.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Life Science
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
GK-12 Program,
Jessica Ray, Phyllis Balcerzak, Barry Williams
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density & Miscibility
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Educational Use
Rating

After students conduct the two associated activities, Density Column Lab - Parts 1 and 2, present this lesson to provide them with an understanding of why the density column's oil, water and syrup layers do not mix and how the concepts of density and miscibility relate to water chemistry and remediation. Topics covered include miscibility, immiscibility, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and hydrophilic. Through the density column lab activities, students see liquids and solids of different densities interact without an understanding of why the resulting layers do not mix. This lesson gives students insight on some of the most fundamental chemical properties of water and how it interacts with different molecules.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Barry Williams
GK-12 Program,
Jessica Ray
Phyllis Balcerzak
Date Added:
09/18/2014