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30-Minute Mozzarella Lab
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Students are able to turn milk into mozzarella cheese in one class ...

Students are able to turn milk into mozzarella cheese in one class period.  This is a great way to demonstrate lactic acid fermentation and the food making process- one of the original biotechnology examples!  Rennet can be purchased online, or you can talk to your local cheese plant to see if they will donate the small amount you will need.  Other ingredients are supplies can easily be purchased in your local grocery store.  

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Amanda Levzow Seichter
Date Added:
06/28/2018
Advanced Foundational SAEs
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This lesson is designed to follow the Intermediate SAEs:The Next Step. The ...

This lesson is designed to follow the Intermediate SAEs:The Next Step. The objective is to continue to move students through the research and development of their Foundational Career SAE. The students will continue to work on their Foundational SAE project based on their career interest, but research topics at the advanced level. The teacher may choose to only use the Foundational SAE project or they can also include an immersion SAE project that students keep track of their time, income and expenses over the course of the class. The students will participate in weekly assignments for their Foundational SAE and if they are completing an immersion SAE they will keep track of their hours each week. Starting SAE projects in the classroom should be simple for the teacher and students. Minimum expectations that can still produce success for all students would be tracking 1-hour of SAE time per week, exploring one career topic per week, and recording one financial entry per month. A final report or project at the end of the class would also be a minimum expectation for all students.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Glenda Crook
Date Added:
08/21/2018
Ag Career Fashion Show
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The objective of this lesson is to help the students better understand ...

The objective of this lesson is to help the students better understand their agricultural career and to share the career with their peers.  The students select an agricultural career using the Ag in the Classroom lesson - Agricultural Careers.  They then research their career and prepare an index card with information to share.  The students are instructed to create a simple outfit showing the items a person in their career might wear for their work.  The students then conduct a Ag Career Fashion Show.  They dress up and read from their card the information they learned about the career.  To make it more fun add a party light and music for them to walk the cat walk for the fashion show!  

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Glenda Crook
Date Added:
01/11/2019
Agribusiness Management  Inputs and Outputs No Bake Cookies
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The Scope of the Agribusiness Industry unit breaks the agribusiness sectors down ...

The Scope of the Agribusiness Industry unit breaks the agribusiness sectors down into input or output or sales versus services.  To help the students understand what agricultural inputs and outputs are in the agricultural products and service industries they conduct a simulation using a no bake cookie recipe.  The students are broken up into pairs or small groups and each group is given a card explainng their agribusiness.  The students create a promotional flyer or sign for their agribusiness.  One group represents the farmer and they have to visit each of the agribusinesses in order to produce their product.  

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Glenda Crook
Date Added:
01/06/2019
Agricultural Careers and Leadership Career Pathway Poster
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Each student creates a poster exhibiting their career choices from kindergarten through ...

Each student creates a poster exhibiting their career choices from kindergarten through high school or their adult life depending on where they are in their career planning.  The students identify the career clusters and pathways that best fit their career choices across their timeline or pathway.  The students become familiar with the career clusters and pathways.  They also learn about new career opportunities that fall under their chosen cluster or pathway.  The students share their poster with the class, which leads to a discussion of how our career choices from 4th grade on don't really change career cluster, but they do change pathways within the cluster.  The students compare their career pathway poster with their "Me" poster (lesson available in Wise Learn, search Me Poster) they made previously to determine the characteristics they have or skills they may need to develop for their future career.  

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Glenda Crook
Date Added:
01/09/2019
Agricultural Careers and Leadership Etiquette Fridays
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Every Friday the students are presented with an etiquette lesson.  The students ...

Every Friday the students are presented with an etiquette lesson.  The students love learning about these skills that will help them in their future careers.  They learn how to tie a tie, shake a hand, how to do an elevator speech, table etiquette, writing thank you cards, and many more.  The students look forward to this each week!  

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Glenda Crook
Date Added:
01/09/2019
Agricultural Careers and Leadership "Me" Poster
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To help the students self analyze their strenghts and weaknesses I have ...

To help the students self analyze their strenghts and weaknesses I have them complete a "Me" poster.  The poster is folded intor 4 quadrants with a diamond in the middle.  The students fill in each quadrant answering why, what, how and what if.  This really gets them thinking about why they are the way they are.  They decorate their posters and then they identify three employability skills that they think they have fully developed and can demonstrate at work.  The students share their posters and then apply their self awareness to their career interest.  

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Glenda Crook
Date Added:
01/09/2019
Animal Science-Dairy Herd Management
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By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-         Summarize ...

By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-         Summarize the steps involved in proper animal management immediately after a cow has had a calf.-         List the symptoms of Johne’s and describe ways in which a newborn calf could become infected with Johne’s Disease.-         Summarize the method(s) of prevention and treatment for an animal with Johne’s.-         List the symptoms of scours; describe ways in which a newborn calf could become infected with scours.-         Summarize the method(s) of prevention and treatment for an animal with scours.-         Summarize the steps involved in proper management of calves that are 4 days old to 2 months old.-         Calculate how much milk a calf should be fed each day based on its birth weight.-         Summarize the steps involved in proper animal management of fresh cows.-         List the symptoms of mastitis and describe ways in which a cow could become infected with this disease.-         Summarize the method(s) of prevention and treatment for an animal with mastitis.-         Summarize the processes and factors involved with the Milk Letdown Reflex and describe the importance of oxytocin and cortisol in regards to this process.-         Describe how milk should be properly handled and stored once it is collected from the cow.-         Define Somatic Cell Count (SCC) and explain its importance to producing a high quality food product.-         Define each of the following: heritability; PTA; STA; EBV; sire summary; genetic base.-         Summarize how a PTA, STA, and EBV are similar and dissimilar.-         Explain how STA scores are calculated and summarize what they mean.-         Use given PTA & STA scores for various traits to summarize the genetic value of bulls.-         Use a sire summary to analyze the genetic potential value of a bull.-         Summarize how the information in a sire summary is generated by describing the process of conducting genetic evaluations.Define each of the following: a.  In Vitro Fertilization    b.  Embryo Transfer   c. Genomics

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science- Feeding and Rations
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By the end of this unit, students will be able to...-         Define ...

By the end of this unit, students will be able to...-         Define each of the following: a. Feeding Ration    b.  Balanced Ration    c.  Nutrient Composition   d.  Total Digestible Nutrients-         Describe how nutrients in a ration are measured.-         Summarize how crude protein is measured in a ration.-         Explain the roles and purposes of each of the following kinds of protein/nitrogen in a ration: a.       Crude Protein    b.  DIP    c.  UIP    d.  NPN   e.  All of the above-         Identify the source of most of the fiber in a cattle ration and summarize the roles played by fiber in a ruminant.-         Define scratch factor and explain its importance to a ration and to ruminant health.-         Explain how minerals are measured in a ration.-         Identify concerns related to meeting vitamin requirements of a ration.-         Summarize how to ensure that an animal is receiving an adequate amount of water and identify its importance to the ration of a ruminant.-         Determine the minimum amount of water needed for a given animal per day.-         Summarize the unique nutritional needs and demands of each of the following groups of cattle: a. Growing weaned calves   b.  First-calf heifers   c.  Mature Cows   d.  Mature bulls  e.  Newborn Calves-         Summarize how the nutrient needs of an animal are best determined.-         Summarize the options available for determining the nutrient content of a feeding ration.-         Explain the significance and role played by land grant universities and extension offices in regards to animal nutrition.-         Summarize the role played by ionophores and implants in cattle rations.-         Explain how and why acidosis occurs and how it can be prevented.-         Use a Pearson Square in order to balance a ration for a variety of groups of cattle and for different rations.-         Show how a Pearson Square can be used to determine both TDN ratios as well as Crude Protein ratios of ration ingredients.-         Use a Pearson Square to determine if the minimum requirements of an animal are met for a ration in regards to crude protein and determine how much, if any, additional protein is needed for a ration.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science-Health and Disease
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Objectives: by the end of this unit, students will...Describe what it means ...

Objectives: by the end of this unit, students will...Describe what it means for an animal to be ‘healthy’.Determine the difference between an infectious and a noninfectious disease.Determine the difference between a contagious and a non-contagious disease.Define: disease, pathogen, host, vector, virulence, environment.Summarize how a host’s defense mechanisms prevent a disease from  occurring and why these mechanisms sometimes break down.Identify and explain the parts of a disease triangle and how they affect disease transmission.Summarize the difference between resistance and immunity.Summarize the difference between active and passive immunity as well as natural and artificial active immunity.Explain how antigens and antibodies interact in order to create immunity in an organism.Summarize how herd immunity works and how it affects the health of a  group of organisms.Define and explain the differences between  each of the following:a. Pandemic   b. Endemic   c. Epidemic   d. Zoonotic

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science- Health and Disease Midterm
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By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-                      Describe ...

By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-                      Describe what it means for an animal to be ‘healthy’.-                      Determine the difference between an infectious and a noninfectious disease.-                      Determine the difference between a contagious and a non-contagious disease.-                      Define: disease, pathogen, host, vector, virulence, environment.-                      Summarize how a host’s defense mechanisms prevent a disease from occurring and why these mechanisms sometimes break down.-                      Identify and explain the parts of a disease triangle and how they affect disease transmission.-                      Summarize the difference between resistance and immunity.-                      Summarize the difference between active and passive immunity as well as natural and artificial active immunity.-                      Explain how antigens and antibodies interact in order to create immunity in an organism.-                      Summarize how herd immunity works and how it affects the health of a group of organisms.-                      Define and explain the differences between each of the following:-                      a. Pandemic   b. Endemic   c. Epidemic   d. Zoonotic-                      Identify and categorize each of the following by the unique characteristics and identifying traits:o   a. Bacteria   b.  Viruses   c.  Fungi   d.  Protozoa   e.  Helminth-                      Define a prion and explain the characteristics that make this class of pathogens unique.-                      Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.-                      Summarize how to classify bacteria, including by shape, aerobic/anaerobic, and by gram stain.-                      Compare and contrast the differences between gram negative and gram positive bacteria, particularly in regards to cell membranes and cell walls, susceptibility to antibiotics, and endotoxins vs. exotoxins.-                      Compare and contrast the properties of endotoxins vs. those of exotoxins.-                      Summarize the properties of peptidoglycan and relate how these properties affect the susceptibility of some bacteria to antibiotics.-                      Summarize the properties and characteristics of the membrane outside of the cell wall of some bacteria in regards to susceptibility to antibiotics, infection of a host, and resistance to host defenses.-                      Summarize how a bacterial infection can lead to the death of a host via sepsis and septic shock.-                      Explain why a virus is not considered to be a living species.-                      Summarize how viral reproduction occurs.-                      Compare and contrast a retrovirus to a standard virus.-                      Identify the kingdom of life in which fungi are classified.-                      Summarize the key traits of protozoa.-                      Explain how the symptoms diseases caused by helminths differ from many other pathogens.-                      Outline the method by which a prion causes a disease and identify practices that increase the likelihood of a prion infection.-                      Describe the existing treatments and/or cures for a prion disease.-                      Summarize the mechanisms and strategies that comprise each of the following: a. continual forms of nonspecific immunity; b. selective forms of nonspecific immunity; c. specific immunity.-                      Compare and contrast the properties of the three kinds of continual nonspecific immunity, including: a. mechanical; b. physical; c. chemical. -                      Summarize the identifying characteristics of all forms of selective nonspecific immunity, including: a. Phagocytosis  b.  Inflammation  c.  Pyrexia  d.  Protective proteins  e.  NK Cells-                      Summarize the function of interferons and complement proteins.-                      Summarize how specific immunity differs from all forms of nonspecific immunity.-                      Explain how the body uses antigens and antibodies to fight a disease.-                      Identify the key traits that comprise each of the following: a.   Genetic specific immunity    b.  Acquired specific immunity   c.  Nonspecific immunity-                      Summarize the difference between active acquired immunity and passive acquired immunity.-                      Explain how a vaccination works to reduce the rate of contraction of a disease.-                      Identify the key characteristics of each of the following kinds of vaccinations:o   a. Live    b.  Killed/Inactivated   c.  Toxoid   d.  Biosynthetic-                      Define colostrum, and explain why it is a valuable part of a production animal operation.-                      Summarize why adult vaccination is necessary for herd health using examples.-                      Define VCPR and explain why it is necessary for an animal operation.-                      Compare and contrast the function and properties of antibiotics and vaccines.-                      Describe the most common methods by which an antibiotic destroys bacteria.-                      Describe the most common bacterial mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.-                      Summarize the difference between Inherent (natural) Bacterial Resistance and Acquired Resistance.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science- Insemination and Calving
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Insemination and Calving Unit Objectives – By the end of this unit, ...

Insemination and Calving Unit Objectives – By the end of this unit, students will be able to…- Explain the difference between insemination and conception.- Identify the window of time in which a cow should be bred after calving.- Determine when it is appropriate to breed a cow by recognizing the signs of a cow in heat.- Summarize the function of each of the following heat detection aids: heat expectancy chart, mount detection aid,tailhead markings, heat detector animals, and pedometers.- Identify when insemination should occur based on when a cow is seen in heat.- Summarize the purpose, function, use, and limitations of the following pregnancy detection methods: rectal palpation,ultrasounds, and blood testing.- Compare and contrast the benefits and drawbacks of twinning in cattle.- Summarize and define each of the following terms: dry period, lactation, gestation, and mastitis.- Summarize the steps necessary to dry off a cow and prevent mastitis during or after the dry period.- Diagnose a case of mastitis based on its symptoms.- Diagnose whether or not a cow is about to calve based on her symptoms.- Summarize the signs of normal calving vs. abnormal calving and diagnose whether or not human intervention isnecessary.- Summarize and explain the steps required to conduct a physical exam on a cow while she is calving.- List the situations in which human intervention during calving will always be necessary.- Explain the proper intervention methods during the following scenarios: upside down calf, backwards calf, calf with ahead/leg bent backwards, calf that is positioned correctly but has not made any progress in at least 30 minutes.- Summarize how to manually dilate the cervix of a cow to aid in calving.- Demonstrate how to properly utilize and apply calving chains in order to assist with cases of dystocia.- Demonstrate how to properly care for the cow and the calf after calving in order to ensure maximal health and preventdisease and infection.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science -Lab Safety
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Lab safety review concepts:• How to safely handle flammable materials.• What to ...

Lab safety review concepts:• How to safely handle flammable materials.• What to do if a fire erupts.• How to properly use eye protection.• What to do if you wear contacts.• What to do if you do not understand directions in a  lab.• How to dispose of chemical wastes.• What to do if you do not finish a lab in time.• How to heat a substance in a test tube.• How to pick up hot glass.• What to do if you are injured.• What to do before using glassware.• What to do if you have loose clothing or long hair  during a lab.• What footwear is appropriate for a lab or outside.• What to do if a chemical is splashed on your skin or eyes.• What number to dial in an emergency.• What to do if you use too much of a chemical.• What to do if glassware is chipped or cracked.• When is it ok to be alone in a lab?• When lab coats, goggle, and gloves are needed.• What to do if there is broken glass or a spilled chemical.• How to properly handle department animals.• How to respond if an animal escapes.• What to do if you have an injury.• What to do if someone else has an injury.• Number for 911• Where the fire alarms, fire blanket, and fire extinguishers  are located.• What to do in a tornado• What to do in a fire• What to do in a Code Red• What to do if you have a question about an assignment.• Where to turn in assignments.• What to do with money for field trips.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
07/25/2018