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2nd Grade Unit on Seed Dispersal, Plant Life Cycles and Pollination
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This unit focuses on the diversity of life at Hartje School Forest ...

This unit focuses on the diversity of life at Hartje School Forest and centers around NGSS Standards on Ecosystem Interactions, Energy and Dynamics. Field experiences in observing and recording the diversity of life, seed dispersal methods, plant pollination, and plant life cycles will support science disciplinary core ideas, cross-cutting concepts, and hands-on engineering practices.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Technology and Engineering
Education
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Life Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Formative Assessment
Interactive
Interim/Summative Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Amy Workman
Stacy Stecker
Date Added:
07/09/2019
Algebra II Module 1: Polynomial, Rational, and Radical Relationships
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Students connect polynomial arithmetic to computations with whole numbers and integers. Students ...

Students connect polynomial arithmetic to computations with whole numbers and integers.  Students learn that the arithmetic of rational expressions is governed by the same rules as the arithmetic of rational numbers.  This unit helps students see connections between solutions to polynomial equations, zeros of polynomials, and graphs of polynomial functions.  Polynomial equations are solved over the set of complex numbers, leading to a beginning understanding of the fundamental theorem of algebra.  Application and modeling problems connect multiple representations and include both real world and purely mathematical situations.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
05/14/2013
Algebra II Module 2
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Module 2 builds on students’ previous work with units and with functions ...

Module 2 builds on students’ previous work with units and with functions from Algebra I, and with trigonometric ratios and circles from high school Geometry. The heart of the module is the study of precise definitions of sine and cosine (as well as tangent and the co-functions) using transformational geometry from high school Geometry. This precision leads to a discussion of a mathematically natural unit of rotational measure, a radian, and students begin to build fluency with the values of the trigonometric functions in terms of radians. Students graph sinusoidal and other trigonometric functions, and use the graphs to help in modeling and discovering properties of trigonometric functions. The study of the properties culminates in the proof of the Pythagorean identity and other trigonometric identities.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
08/15/2014
Algebra II Module 3: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
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In this module, students synthesize and generalize what they have learned about ...

In this module, students synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families.  They extend the domain of exponential functions to the entire real line (N-RN.A.1) and then extend their work with these functions to include solving exponential equations with logarithms (F-LE.A.4).  They explore (with appropriate tools) the effects of transformations on graphs of exponential and logarithmic functions.  They notice that the transformations on a graph of a logarithmic function relate to the logarithmic properties (F-BF.B.3).  Students identify appropriate types of functions to model a situation.  They adjust parameters to improve the model, and they compare models by analyzing appropriateness of fit and making judgments about the domain over which a model is a good fit.  The description of modeling as, “the process of choosing and using mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to make decisions,” is at the heart of this module.  In particular, through repeated opportunities in working through the modeling cycle (see page 61 of the CCLS), students acquire the insight that the same mathematical or statistical structure can sometimes model seemingly different situations.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/16/2014
Algebra II Module 4: Inferences and Conclusions from Data
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Students build a formal understanding of probability, considering complex events such as ...

Students build a formal understanding of probability, considering complex events such as unions, intersections, and complements as well as the concept of independence and conditional probability.  The idea of using a smooth curve to model a data distribution is introduced along with using tables and techonolgy to find areas under a normal curve.  Students make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies.  Data is used from random samples to estimate a population mean or proportion.  Students calculate margin of error and interpret it in context.  Given data from a statistical experiment, students use simulation to create a randomization distribution and use it to determine if there is a significant difference between two treatments.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
03/24/2016
Algebra I Module 2: Descriptive Statistics
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In this module, students reconnect with and deepen their understanding of statistics ...

In this module, students reconnect with and deepen their understanding of statistics and probability concepts first introduced in Grades 6, 7, and 8. Students develop a set of tools for understanding and interpreting variability in data, and begin to make more informed decisions from data. They work with data distributions of various shapes, centers, and spreads. Students build on their experience with bivariate quantitative data from Grade 8. This module sets the stage for more extensive work with sampling and inference in later grades.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
08/01/2013
Algebra I Module 3:  Linear and Exponential Functions
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In earlier grades, students define, evaluate, and compare functions and use them ...

In earlier grades, students define, evaluate, and compare functions and use them to model relationships between quantities. In this module, students extend their study of functions to include function notation and the concepts of domain and range. They explore many examples of functions and their graphs, focusing on the contrast between linear and exponential functions. They interpret functions given graphically, numerically, symbolically, and verbally; translate between representations; and understand the limitations of various representations.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/17/2013
Algebra I Module 4: Polynomial and Quadratic Expressions, Equations, and Functions
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In earlier modules, students analyze the process of solving equations and developing ...

In earlier modules, students analyze the process of solving equations and developing fluency in writing, interpreting, and translating between various forms of linear equations (Module 1) and linear and exponential functions (Module 3). These experiences combined with modeling with data (Module 2), set the stage for Module 4. Here students continue to interpret expressions, create equations, rewrite equations and functions in different but equivalent forms, and graph and interpret functions, but this time using polynomial functions, and more specifically quadratic functions, as well as square root and cube root functions.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/17/2013
Animal Science-Dairy Herd Management
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By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-         Summarize ...

By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-         Summarize the steps involved in proper animal management immediately after a cow has had a calf.-         List the symptoms of Johne’s and describe ways in which a newborn calf could become infected with Johne’s Disease.-         Summarize the method(s) of prevention and treatment for an animal with Johne’s.-         List the symptoms of scours; describe ways in which a newborn calf could become infected with scours.-         Summarize the method(s) of prevention and treatment for an animal with scours.-         Summarize the steps involved in proper management of calves that are 4 days old to 2 months old.-         Calculate how much milk a calf should be fed each day based on its birth weight.-         Summarize the steps involved in proper animal management of fresh cows.-         List the symptoms of mastitis and describe ways in which a cow could become infected with this disease.-         Summarize the method(s) of prevention and treatment for an animal with mastitis.-         Summarize the processes and factors involved with the Milk Letdown Reflex and describe the importance of oxytocin and cortisol in regards to this process.-         Describe how milk should be properly handled and stored once it is collected from the cow.-         Define Somatic Cell Count (SCC) and explain its importance to producing a high quality food product.-         Define each of the following: heritability; PTA; STA; EBV; sire summary; genetic base.-         Summarize how a PTA, STA, and EBV are similar and dissimilar.-         Explain how STA scores are calculated and summarize what they mean.-         Use given PTA & STA scores for various traits to summarize the genetic value of bulls.-         Use a sire summary to analyze the genetic potential value of a bull.-         Summarize how the information in a sire summary is generated by describing the process of conducting genetic evaluations.Define each of the following: a.  In Vitro Fertilization    b.  Embryo Transfer   c. Genomics

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science- Feeding and Rations
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By the end of this unit, students will be able to...-         Define ...

By the end of this unit, students will be able to...-         Define each of the following: a. Feeding Ration    b.  Balanced Ration    c.  Nutrient Composition   d.  Total Digestible Nutrients-         Describe how nutrients in a ration are measured.-         Summarize how crude protein is measured in a ration.-         Explain the roles and purposes of each of the following kinds of protein/nitrogen in a ration: a.       Crude Protein    b.  DIP    c.  UIP    d.  NPN   e.  All of the above-         Identify the source of most of the fiber in a cattle ration and summarize the roles played by fiber in a ruminant.-         Define scratch factor and explain its importance to a ration and to ruminant health.-         Explain how minerals are measured in a ration.-         Identify concerns related to meeting vitamin requirements of a ration.-         Summarize how to ensure that an animal is receiving an adequate amount of water and identify its importance to the ration of a ruminant.-         Determine the minimum amount of water needed for a given animal per day.-         Summarize the unique nutritional needs and demands of each of the following groups of cattle: a. Growing weaned calves   b.  First-calf heifers   c.  Mature Cows   d.  Mature bulls  e.  Newborn Calves-         Summarize how the nutrient needs of an animal are best determined.-         Summarize the options available for determining the nutrient content of a feeding ration.-         Explain the significance and role played by land grant universities and extension offices in regards to animal nutrition.-         Summarize the role played by ionophores and implants in cattle rations.-         Explain how and why acidosis occurs and how it can be prevented.-         Use a Pearson Square in order to balance a ration for a variety of groups of cattle and for different rations.-         Show how a Pearson Square can be used to determine both TDN ratios as well as Crude Protein ratios of ration ingredients.-         Use a Pearson Square to determine if the minimum requirements of an animal are met for a ration in regards to crude protein and determine how much, if any, additional protein is needed for a ration.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science-Health and Disease
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Objectives: by the end of this unit, students will...Describe what it means ...

Objectives: by the end of this unit, students will...Describe what it means for an animal to be ‘healthy’.Determine the difference between an infectious and a noninfectious disease.Determine the difference between a contagious and a non-contagious disease.Define: disease, pathogen, host, vector, virulence, environment.Summarize how a host’s defense mechanisms prevent a disease from  occurring and why these mechanisms sometimes break down.Identify and explain the parts of a disease triangle and how they affect disease transmission.Summarize the difference between resistance and immunity.Summarize the difference between active and passive immunity as well as natural and artificial active immunity.Explain how antigens and antibodies interact in order to create immunity in an organism.Summarize how herd immunity works and how it affects the health of a  group of organisms.Define and explain the differences between  each of the following:a. Pandemic   b. Endemic   c. Epidemic   d. Zoonotic

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science- Health and Disease Midterm
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By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-                      Describe ...

By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-                      Describe what it means for an animal to be ‘healthy’.-                      Determine the difference between an infectious and a noninfectious disease.-                      Determine the difference between a contagious and a non-contagious disease.-                      Define: disease, pathogen, host, vector, virulence, environment.-                      Summarize how a host’s defense mechanisms prevent a disease from occurring and why these mechanisms sometimes break down.-                      Identify and explain the parts of a disease triangle and how they affect disease transmission.-                      Summarize the difference between resistance and immunity.-                      Summarize the difference between active and passive immunity as well as natural and artificial active immunity.-                      Explain how antigens and antibodies interact in order to create immunity in an organism.-                      Summarize how herd immunity works and how it affects the health of a group of organisms.-                      Define and explain the differences between each of the following:-                      a. Pandemic   b. Endemic   c. Epidemic   d. Zoonotic-                      Identify and categorize each of the following by the unique characteristics and identifying traits:o   a. Bacteria   b.  Viruses   c.  Fungi   d.  Protozoa   e.  Helminth-                      Define a prion and explain the characteristics that make this class of pathogens unique.-                      Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.-                      Summarize how to classify bacteria, including by shape, aerobic/anaerobic, and by gram stain.-                      Compare and contrast the differences between gram negative and gram positive bacteria, particularly in regards to cell membranes and cell walls, susceptibility to antibiotics, and endotoxins vs. exotoxins.-                      Compare and contrast the properties of endotoxins vs. those of exotoxins.-                      Summarize the properties of peptidoglycan and relate how these properties affect the susceptibility of some bacteria to antibiotics.-                      Summarize the properties and characteristics of the membrane outside of the cell wall of some bacteria in regards to susceptibility to antibiotics, infection of a host, and resistance to host defenses.-                      Summarize how a bacterial infection can lead to the death of a host via sepsis and septic shock.-                      Explain why a virus is not considered to be a living species.-                      Summarize how viral reproduction occurs.-                      Compare and contrast a retrovirus to a standard virus.-                      Identify the kingdom of life in which fungi are classified.-                      Summarize the key traits of protozoa.-                      Explain how the symptoms diseases caused by helminths differ from many other pathogens.-                      Outline the method by which a prion causes a disease and identify practices that increase the likelihood of a prion infection.-                      Describe the existing treatments and/or cures for a prion disease.-                      Summarize the mechanisms and strategies that comprise each of the following: a. continual forms of nonspecific immunity; b. selective forms of nonspecific immunity; c. specific immunity.-                      Compare and contrast the properties of the three kinds of continual nonspecific immunity, including: a. mechanical; b. physical; c. chemical. -                      Summarize the identifying characteristics of all forms of selective nonspecific immunity, including: a. Phagocytosis  b.  Inflammation  c.  Pyrexia  d.  Protective proteins  e.  NK Cells-                      Summarize the function of interferons and complement proteins.-                      Summarize how specific immunity differs from all forms of nonspecific immunity.-                      Explain how the body uses antigens and antibodies to fight a disease.-                      Identify the key traits that comprise each of the following: a.   Genetic specific immunity    b.  Acquired specific immunity   c.  Nonspecific immunity-                      Summarize the difference between active acquired immunity and passive acquired immunity.-                      Explain how a vaccination works to reduce the rate of contraction of a disease.-                      Identify the key characteristics of each of the following kinds of vaccinations:o   a. Live    b.  Killed/Inactivated   c.  Toxoid   d.  Biosynthetic-                      Define colostrum, and explain why it is a valuable part of a production animal operation.-                      Summarize why adult vaccination is necessary for herd health using examples.-                      Define VCPR and explain why it is necessary for an animal operation.-                      Compare and contrast the function and properties of antibiotics and vaccines.-                      Describe the most common methods by which an antibiotic destroys bacteria.-                      Describe the most common bacterial mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.-                      Summarize the difference between Inherent (natural) Bacterial Resistance and Acquired Resistance.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science- Insemination and Calving
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Insemination and Calving Unit Objectives – By the end of this unit, ...

Insemination and Calving Unit Objectives – By the end of this unit, students will be able to…- Explain the difference between insemination and conception.- Identify the window of time in which a cow should be bred after calving.- Determine when it is appropriate to breed a cow by recognizing the signs of a cow in heat.- Summarize the function of each of the following heat detection aids: heat expectancy chart, mount detection aid,tailhead markings, heat detector animals, and pedometers.- Identify when insemination should occur based on when a cow is seen in heat.- Summarize the purpose, function, use, and limitations of the following pregnancy detection methods: rectal palpation,ultrasounds, and blood testing.- Compare and contrast the benefits and drawbacks of twinning in cattle.- Summarize and define each of the following terms: dry period, lactation, gestation, and mastitis.- Summarize the steps necessary to dry off a cow and prevent mastitis during or after the dry period.- Diagnose a case of mastitis based on its symptoms.- Diagnose whether or not a cow is about to calve based on her symptoms.- Summarize the signs of normal calving vs. abnormal calving and diagnose whether or not human intervention isnecessary.- Summarize and explain the steps required to conduct a physical exam on a cow while she is calving.- List the situations in which human intervention during calving will always be necessary.- Explain the proper intervention methods during the following scenarios: upside down calf, backwards calf, calf with ahead/leg bent backwards, calf that is positioned correctly but has not made any progress in at least 30 minutes.- Summarize how to manually dilate the cervix of a cow to aid in calving.- Demonstrate how to properly utilize and apply calving chains in order to assist with cases of dystocia.- Demonstrate how to properly care for the cow and the calf after calving in order to ensure maximal health and preventdisease and infection.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science -Lab Safety
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Lab safety review concepts:• How to safely handle flammable materials.• What to ...

Lab safety review concepts:• How to safely handle flammable materials.• What to do if a fire erupts.• How to properly use eye protection.• What to do if you wear contacts.• What to do if you do not understand directions in a  lab.• How to dispose of chemical wastes.• What to do if you do not finish a lab in time.• How to heat a substance in a test tube.• How to pick up hot glass.• What to do if you are injured.• What to do before using glassware.• What to do if you have loose clothing or long hair  during a lab.• What footwear is appropriate for a lab or outside.• What to do if a chemical is splashed on your skin or eyes.• What number to dial in an emergency.• What to do if you use too much of a chemical.• What to do if glassware is chipped or cracked.• When is it ok to be alone in a lab?• When lab coats, goggle, and gloves are needed.• What to do if there is broken glass or a spilled chemical.• How to properly handle department animals.• How to respond if an animal escapes.• What to do if you have an injury.• What to do if someone else has an injury.• Number for 911• Where the fire alarms, fire blanket, and fire extinguishers  are located.• What to do in a tornado• What to do in a fire• What to do in a Code Red• What to do if you have a question about an assignment.• Where to turn in assignments.• What to do with money for field trips.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
07/25/2018
Animal Science- Meat Science
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Meat Science Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will ...

Meat Science Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be able to…1. Calculate ADG and WDA and summarize the significance of these calculations.2. Summarize the differences between prenatal and postnatal growth in meat animals.3. Interpret a sigmoid growth curve and identify the point of birth, point of inflection, point of maturation, and puberty.4. Determine which animal will be more profitable and valuable based on differences in the sigmoid growth curves.5. Plot changes that occur due to castration using a sigmoid growth curve.6. Interpret the changes in the rate of growth of muscle, bone, and fat in a meat animal between birth and maturation; utilize thesedifferences in rates of tissue growth to justify when an animal should be harvested for maximal meat quality and profitability.7. Summarize the benefits and drawbacks of castration in meat animals.8. Describe use of anabolic implants & beta-antagonists in meat animals, and support your stance on this issue with evidence.9. Calculate dressing percentage of a given meat animal if provided with the live weight and carcass weight.10. Calculate the cutting losses and cutting yields of a carcass.11. Summarize the impact of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle on regulation in the meat industry and provide a summary of changes thathave occurred in the regulation of the meat industry since the early 1900s.12. Summarize the purpose and role of each of the following pieces of legislation: a. Pure Food & Drug Act b. Meat Inspection Actc. Wholesome Meat Act d. Humane Slaughter Act/Humane Methods of Slaughter Act13. Define “adulterated meat” and provide examples of actions that would cause a cut of meat to be considered adulterated meat.14. Determine whether not federal inspection is required for a given meat processing facility and what this inspection would entail.15. Summarize the stipulations that are required by a facility in order to fully comply with HMSA.16. Compare and contrast what occurs during antemortem and postmortem federal inspection of meat facilities.17. Grade a cut of beef, pork, or poultry based on a picture or written description.18. Define “complete protein” and explain the difference between an essential amino acid and a nonessential amino acid.19. Define “marbling” and summarize the importance of this concept in regards to the quality and value of a cut of meat.20. Summarize how meat changes as a result of the Maillard Reaction and as a result of fermentation.21. Identify the key factors that affect the flavor and quality of a cut of meat.22. Summarize all of the factors that are necessary for muscle to be converted into meat.23. Summarize the importance of tenderness in regards to the value of a cut of meat and describe the factors that affect thetenderness of meat.24. Summarize the role that each of the following play in the sliding filament model: a. Myosin b. Actin c. Troponin/Tropomyosind. ATP e. Calcium25. Identify the components of the sliding filament model in a given image.26. Explain how the sliding filament model, rigor mortis, tenderness, and meat quality are all related.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/21/2018
Animal Science- Nutrient and Ruminent Anatomy
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Nutrition & Ruminant Anatomy Unit Objectives: by the end of this unit, ...

Nutrition & Ruminant Anatomy Unit Objectives: by the end of this unit, students will be able to…- Summarize the extent of the universality of nutrient requirements among living species in regards to the sixkinds of nutrients.- Identify the nutrient most important for living species and summarize the roles it plays in the bodies ofanimals.- List key characteristics and identify the roles played by each of the following nutrients:water, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals.- List key characteristics and identify the roles played by each of the following fat soluble vitamins: A, D, E, K.- List key characteristics and identify the roles played by each of the following water soluble vitamins:a. B12 b. Choline c. Thiamin (B1)/Niacin (B3)- Explain why vitamin C is not needed in the diets of most animals.- List key characteristics and identify the roles played by each of the following macrominerals:a. Potassium b. Sodium/Chlorine c. Sulfur d. Calcium/Phosphorus e. Magnesium- List key characteristics and identify the roles played by each of the following microminerals:a. Iron b. Copper c. Zinc d. Fluorine e. Manganese- Summarize the identifying characteristics of each of the following classes of digestive tracts:a. Ruminant b. Avian c. Post-gastric fermenters d. Monogastrics- Explain the function and characteristics of each of the following organs: a. Gizzard b. Cecum c. Rumen- Summarize the advantages of disadvantages of being a ruminant.- Identify the function of each of the following stomach chambers:a. Rumen b. Reticulum c. Omasum d. Abomasum.- Describe the path of food starting at the mouth and proceeding through each stomach chamber and typeof intestine.- Define “VFA” and summarize its importance to a ruminant.- Identify and explain the roles of saliva in digestion for a ruminant.- Explain the meaning and importance of each of the following for a ruminant:a. Rumination b. Eructation c. Peristalsis d. Papillae e. Villi- Explain the rate at which forage is fermented in the rumen and how it changes inside the rumen during thistime.- Summarize the four key benefits provided to a ruminant by its rumen microbes.- Explain how a calf becomes a ruminant by incorporating the role and purpose of the esophageal groove in anewborn calf and by identifying its source of the rumen microbes.- Compare and contrast the abomasum of a ruminant to the stomach of a human.- Summarize the processes that occur in the small and large intestine that enable digestion and other criticalprocesses.- Diagnose the most likely outcomes for a ruminant for each of the following scenarios:o Iron Or Copper Deficiencyo Manganese Deficiencyo Swollen Large Intestineo Inability To Perform Eructationo Absent Or Swollen Villio Swollen Papillae/Inability To Absorb VFAso Reduced Saliva Productiono Decrease In Rumen Microbe Populations

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science-Pathogens
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Pathogens Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be ...

Pathogens Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be able to…- Explain the most likely method by which a pathogen gains entrance into its host.- Explain how a pathogen can become established by focusing on a specific kind of tissue.- Summarize the main causes of bodily damage from an infection by a pathogen.- Identify and categorize each of the following by the unique characteristics and identifying traits:  a. Bacteria b. Viruses c. Fungi d. Protozoa e. Helminth- Define a prion and explain the characteristics that make this class of pathogens unique.- Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.- Summarize how to classify bacteria, including by shape, aerobic/anaerobic, and by gram stain.- Compare and contrast the differences between gram negative and gram positive bacteria, particularly inregards to cell membranes and cell walls, susceptibility to antibiotics, and endotoxins vs. exotoxins.- Compare and contrast the properties of endotoxins vs. those of exotoxins.- Summarize the properties of peptidoglycan and relate how these properties affect the susceptibility ofsome bacteria to antibiotics.- Summarize the properties and characteristics of the membrane outside of the cell wall of some bacteriain regards to susceptibility to antibiotics, infection of a host, and resistance to host defenses.- Summarize how a bacterial infection can lead to the death of a host via sepsis and septic shock.- Explain why a virus is not considered to be a living species.- Summarize how viral reproduction occurs.- Compare and contrast a retrovirus to a standard virus.- Identify the kingdom of life in which fungi are classified.- Summarize the key traits of protozoa.- Explain how the symptoms diseases caused by helminths differ from many other pathogens.- Outline the method by which a prion causes a disease and identify practices that increase the likelihoodof a prion infection.- Describe the existing treatments and/or cures for a prion disease.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Animal Science-Reproductive Anatomy
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Reproductive Anatomy Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will ...

Reproductive Anatomy Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-         Identify the following from both images of the reproductive tract as well as by their descriptions: uterus, vulva, oviduct, cervix, and vagina. -         List the causes of reproductive inefficiency in livestock.-         Compare and contrast natural and artificial insemination.-         Explain how each of the following change during estrus: vulva; oviduct; vagina; ovary.-         Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following cervical structures: a. Fornix   b.  Annular Rings   c.  Mucus Plug  -         Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following uterine tissues:a. Perimetrium   b.  Myometrium   c.  Endometrium   d. Caruncles-         Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following regions in the oviduct: a.  UTJ    b.  Isthmus   c.  Ampulla   d. Infundibulum-         Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following ovarian structures: a.  Ova    b.  Follicles   c.  Corpus Luteum -         List and describe the signs of estrus in a cow.-         Summarize the causes, symptoms, and implications of each of the following disorders:a. Ovarian Cyst   b.  Anestrus   c.  Freemartin   d.  Blind/Closed Cervix   e.  Dystocia  f. Metritisg. Retained Placenta  h. Anestrus  i.  Uterine Prolapse   j. Vaginal Prolapse   k.  Repeat Breeding

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell
Date Added:
08/14/2018
Animal Science-Reproductive Midterm and Project
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Reproduction Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be ...

Reproduction Unit Objectives: By the end of this unit, students will be able to…-          Identify the following from both images of the reproductive tract as well as by their descriptions: uterus, vulva, oviduct, cervix, and vagina. -          List the causes of reproductive inefficiency in livestock.-          Compare and contrast natural and artificial insemination.-          Explain how each of the following change during estrus: vulva; oviduct; vagina; ovary.-          Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following cervical structures: a. Fornix   b.  Annular Rings   c.  Mucus Plug  -          Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following uterine tissues:a. Perimetrium   b.  Myometrium   c.  Endometrium   d. Caruncles-          Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following regions in the oviduct: a.  UTJ    b.  Isthmus   c.  Ampulla   d. Infundibulum-          Identify and explain the purpose (if any) of each of the following ovarian structures: a.  Ova    b.  Follicles   c.  Corpus Luteum -          List and describe the signs of estrus in a cow.-          Summarize the causes, symptoms, and implications of each of the following disorders:a. Ovarian Cyst   b.  Anestrus   c.  Freemartin   d.  Blind/Closed Cervix   e.  Dystocia  f. Metritisg. Retained Placenta  h. Anestrus  i.  Uterine Prolapse   j. Vaginal Prolapse   k.  Repeat Breeding-          Define and describe each of the following: a. Estrous Cycle    b.  Endocrine Gland   c.  Target Tissue   d.  Estrus   e.  Endocrine System-          Summarize how a hormone “knows” which tissues and organs to activate.-          Explain why two messenger systems are needed in the bodies of animals.-          Identify, describe, and explain the function of GnRH, FSH, LH, Estradiol, Progesterone, and PGF2α.-          Identify GnRH, FSH, LH, Estradiol, Progesterone, and PGF2α based on when the reach their peak levels in the estrous cycle.-          Explain the purpose, mechanism, and hormonal components of Lutalyse, Ovsynch, CIDR, and MGA.-          Summarize and explain each of the following stages of the estrous cycle:a.  Estrus    b.  Metestrus   c.  Diestrus    d.  Proestrus-          Explain the difference between a paracrine and endocrine hormone.-          Explain the difference between insemination and conception.-          Identify the window of time in which a cow should be bred after calving.-          Determine when it is appropriate to breed a cow by recognizing the signs of a cow in heat.-          Summarize the function of each of the following heat detection aids: heat expectancy chart, mount detection aid, tailhead markings, heat detector animals, and pedometers.-          Identify when insemination should occur based on when a cow is seen in heat.-          Summarize the purpose, function, use, and limitations of the following pregnancy detection methods: rectal palpation, ultrasounds, and blood testing.-          Compare and contrast the benefits and drawbacks of twinning in cattle.-          Summarize and define each of the following terms: dry period, lactation, gestation, and mastitis.-          Summarize the steps necessary to dry off a cow and prevent mastitis during or after the dry period.-          Diagnose a case of mastitis based on its symptoms.-          Diagnose whether or not a cow is about to calve based on her symptoms.-          Summarize the signs of normal calving vs. abnormal calving and diagnose whether or not human intervention is necessary.-          Summarize and explain the steps required to conduct a physical exam on a cow while she is calving.-          List the situations in which human intervention during calving will always be necessary.-          Explain the proper intervention methods during the following scenarios: upside down calf, backwards calf,                 calf with a head/leg bent backwards, calf that is positioned correctly but has not made any progress in at least 30 minutes.-          Summarize how to manually dilate the cervix of a cow to aid in calving.-          Demonstrate how to properly utilize and apply calving chains in order to assist with cases of dystocia.-          Demonstrate how to properly care for the cow and the calf after calving in order to ensure maximal health and prevent disease and infection. 

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Jennifer Russell