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Acceso
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Acceso is a complete, interactive curriculum for intermediate-level learners of Spanish. The materials on the site are provided freely to the public and are intended as a replacement for commercial textbooks, which are generally ill-suited to the learning outcomes now considered crucial to successful language study. These materials are supplemented by an online workbook built on the MySpanishLab platform of Pearson Education, Inc., as well as detailed lesson plans, rubrics for the evaluation of student work, and reliable instruments for measuring student progress and learning outcomes.Winner of 2012 Computer Assisted Language Consortium (CALICO) Focus AwardReviewed in:CALICO Journal 29.2 (Jan 2012): 398-405.Hispania 95.2 (June 2012): 365-366

Subject:
Fine Arts
World Cultures
World Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
University of Kansas
Author:
Amy Rossomondo et al.
Date Added:
10/10/2017
Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture, Spring 2004
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have exhausted itself more than two decades ago.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Scribner, Charity
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Arabic I
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This is a textbook for beginning Arabic language learning. The textbook is divided into twelve lessons. Each lesson focuses on an activity and common theme to introduce the basics of Arabic. Each lesson starts with a short video, which you'll be asked to watch. To help you understand the video, each lesson also includes a transcript (in English), a list of vocabulary (with audio clips), and language and grammar notes.

Subject:
Fine Arts
World Cultures
World Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Date Added:
10/10/2017
Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes, Fall 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Art and Design
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wampler, Jan
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Art Since 1940, Fall 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" -- art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Art and Design
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jones, Caroline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Assessment Design Toolkit
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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CSAI has collaborated with the Reform Support Network to share this Assessment Design Toolkit. The Toolkit includes v​ideos and supplemental materials to help teachers write and select well-designed assessments. Although the primary audience is teachers and principals, district and State leaders can use the Toolkit to design professional development opportunities.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Business and Information Technology
Family and Consumer Sciences
Health Science
Marketing, Management and Entrepreneurship
Technology and Engineering
Computer Science
Geology
Education
Character Education
Early Learning
English Language Arts
Fine Arts
Art and Design
Performing and Visual Arts
Biology
Environmental Science
Nutrition Education
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Economics
Ethnic Studies
Geography
Psychology
Sociology and Anthropology
World Cultures
World Languages
Material Type:
Assessment Item
Formative Assessment
Interim/Summative Assessment
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Self Assessment
Provider:
WestEd/CRESST
Date Added:
03/23/2017
Assessment Literacy Making Sense of K-12 Assessment for Learning
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Teachers and administrators may use this resource to learn why sound assessment practices are critical to foster learning and how the different tools serve different purposes; find out what assessment results are telling you about students and learn what makes a quality assessment; and integrate assessment into teaching and the importance of keeping students invested in their own learning.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Business and Information Technology
Family and Consumer Sciences
Health Science
Marketing, Management and Entrepreneurship
Technology and Engineering
Computer Science
Geology
Education
Character Education
Early Learning
English Language Arts
Fine Arts
Art and Design
Performing and Visual Arts
Biology
Environmental Science
Nutrition Education
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Economics
Ethnic Studies
Geography
Psychology
Sociology and Anthropology
World Cultures
World Languages
Material Type:
Assessment Item
Formative Assessment
Interim/Summative Assessment
Provider:
NWEA
Date Added:
09/27/2017
Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture, Spring 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Childhood is a source of fascination in most Western cultures. It is both a major inspiration for artistic creation and a political ideal, which aims at protecting future generations. Which role does it play in French society and in other francophone areas? Why is the French national anthem (La Marseillaise) addressed to its 'children'? This course will study the transformation of childhood since the 18th century and the development of sentimentality within the family. We will examine various representations of childhood in literature (e.g. Pagnol, Proust, Sarraute, Laye, Morgiĺvre), movies (e.g. Truffaut), and songs (e.g. Brel, Barbara). Course taught in French.

Subject:
Literature
Fine Arts
World Cultures
World Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perreau, Bruno
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Cendrillon
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This lesson provides teachers with support for using text-dependent questions to help students derive big ideas and key understandings while developing vocabulary using the modern fairytale, Cendrillon. In this Caribbean Cinderella story, Cendrillon is treated as a servant by her step-mother and half-sister. Nannin, the gogmother, uses a magic wand to ready Cendrillon for a ball, where Cendrillon meets a rich man's son, Paul, who falls in love with her and finds her when she is lost to him.

Subject:
Literature
Fine Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Basal Alignment Project
Provider Set:
Anchorage District
Author:
Robert D. San Souci
Date Added:
10/10/2017
City to City: Comparing, Researching and Writing about Cities: New Orleans, Spring 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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City to City, as a class, will jump into the complexity of planning in New Orleans, a post-disaster city. City-to-City will ask how a post-disaster city grapple with its ideas of identity, what it is, who it represents, and how it projects its sense of self to residences, businesses, tourists, and to the outside world. In considering its people, how do city planners think about who lives where and why? At the same time, how can city planners celebrate a city's history and its culture and how can these elements be woven into reconstruction? Students will travel from Cambridge to New Orleans over Spring Break to meet and consult with their alumni clients, and continue to work on projects.

Subject:
Fine Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abbanat, Cherie Miot
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Communicating Across Cultures, Spring 2005
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In an increasingly interconnected world, communicating across cultures is a crucial skill in the international networks of business, science, and technology. Subject examines a range of communication styles and techniques resulting from different cultural norms and traditions. It begins with a general theoretical framework and then moves into case studies. Topics include understanding the relationship between communication and culture, differences in verbal and non-verbal communication styles, barriers to intercultural communication, modes of specific cross-cultural communication activities (e.g. argumentation, negotiation, conflict resolution) and intercultural adjustment. Case studies explore specific ways of communicating in Asian and European cultures. Graduate students are expected to complete additional assignments. Taught in English.It has become commonplace knowledge that globalization is one of the major forces shaping our world. If we look at the spread of information, ideas, capital, media, cultural artifacts--or for that matter, people--we can see the boundaries and borders that have historically separated one country or one group from another are becoming more and more permeable. For proof of this close to home, you need only to look at the composition of the MIT student body: 8 percent of the undergraduates and 37 percent of the graduate students are from 109 different countries. "Communicating Across Cultures" is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a world in which, increasingly, you will be asked to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. Its primary goals are to help you become more sensitive to intercultural communication differences, and to provide you with the knowledge and skills that will help you interact successfully with people from cultures other than your own. We hope the course will accomplish those goals by exposing you to some of the best writers and scholars on the subject of intercultural communication, and by giving you a variety of opportunities to practice intercultural communication yourself. As you read the syllabus for this course, we hope you get a sense of our commitment to making this course a rewarding experience for you.

Subject:
Literature
Fine Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Bernd Breslow
Lori
Widdig
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Cross-Cultural Investigations: Technology and Development, Fall 2012
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course enhances cross-cultural understanding through the discussion of practical, ethical, and epistemological issues in conducting social science and applied research in foreign countries or unfamiliar communities. It includes a research practicum to help students develop interviewing, participant-observation, and other qualitative research skills, as well as critical discussion of case studies. The course is open to all interested students, but intended particularly for those planning to undertake exploratory research or applied work abroad. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subject:
Global Education
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Heather Paxson
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Contemporary French Society, Fall 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is an intermediate subject designed to help students gradually build an in-depth understanding of France. The course focuses on French attitudes and values regarding education, work, family and institutions, and deals with the differing notions that underlie interpersonal interactions and communication styles, such as politeness, friendship and formality. Using a Web comparative, cross-cultural approach, students explore a variety of French and American materials, then analyze and compare them using questionnaires, opinion polls, news reports (in different media), as well as a variety of historical, anthropological and literary texts. Throughout the course, attention is given to the development of relevant linguistics skills. This course is recommended for students planning to study and work in France and is taught in French.

Subject:
Fine Arts
World Cultures
World Languages
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Sabine Levet
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Cultural History of Technology, Spring 2005
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Technology and Engineering
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Marx, Leo
Williams, Rosalind
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Debating the Bomb
Read the Fine Print
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0.0 stars

Students will research how the development of the atomic bomb affected people in World War II, participate in a debate about the bomb's use, and investigate how it has affected people's lives since 1945.

Subject:
Fine Arts
U.S. History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
J. Paul Getty Museum
Provider Set:
Getty Education
Date Added:
10/10/2017
East Asia in the World, Spring 2003
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners.

Subject:
Fine Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perdue, Peter C.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
East Asian Cultures: From Zen to Pop, Spring 2015
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Examines traditional forms of East Asian culture (including literature, art, performance, food, and religion) as well as contemporary forms of popular culture (film, pop music, karaoke, and manga). Covers China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, with an emphasis on China. Attention given to women's culture. The influence and presence of Asian cultural expressions in the US are also considered. Use made of resources in the Boston area, including the MFA, the Children's Museum, and the Sackler collection at Harvard. Taught in English.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Performing and Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Emma teng
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Edo: Art in Japan, 1615Đ1868
Read the Fine Print
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This program surveys two centuries of art and culture in the city now known as Tokyo. Ceramics, screens, textiles, prints, paintings, and armor are among the materials discussed.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Art History
Performing and Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Date Added:
10/10/2017
Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century, Spring 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Physics
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kaiser, David
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300, Fall 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Survey of the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1300. Topics include: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the Carolingian Renaissance; feudalism and the breakdown of political order; the crusades; the quality of religious life; the experience of women; and the emergence of a revitalized economy and culture in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Ancient History
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne Elizabeth Conger
Date Added:
01/01/2003