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Battle of Little Bighorn
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(From the Stanford History Education Website)
In the decades following the Civil War, the US military clashed with Native Americans in the West.  The Battle of Little Bighorn was one of the Native Americans most famous victories. In this lesson, students explore causes of the battle by comparing two primary documents with a textbook account.

Subject:
American Indian Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Stanford University
Date Added:
10/05/2016
Bias Activity
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Bias is defined as a particular tendency, trend, inclination, feeling, or opinion, especially one that is preconceived or unreasoned. All people have bias in favor of some things and against some things. That is alright as long as it doesn’t lead to prejudice or discrimination against people that have different beliefs. Bias against Native American people in the United States has been a very harmful aspect of our history and has had a negative impact upon Native Americans. This lesson focuses on the concept of bias and helps students to analyze materials to look for examples of bias in today’s world.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Guidelines for Choosing Culturally Appropriate Literature About Native American People
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Guidelines for Choosing Culturally Appropriate Literature About Native American People Mike Mestelle from Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua, WI and Carol Amour from Lac du Flambeau, WI discuss guidelines to help classroom teachers choose literature written by Native American authors or about Native American people that would be appropriate for use in school classrooms. Carol Amour represents the First Nations Traveling Resource Center, she works with the Indian Community School of Milwaukee in Franklin, WI, and has worked with the George W. Brown Museum in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reference Material
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Biography Unit
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Students read and listen to biographies. Students will conduct a research project on a biography of their choosing, make a timeline, write a report and use it to create a seven slide presentation in Google Slides about the Native American person of their choosing.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Speaking and Listening
American Indian Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Jolene Arndt
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Cultural Children's Stories
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The cultural children's story project allows students to explore Native American culture through a new lens by authoring and illustrating children's stories that teach children between the ages of four and six a lesson or tale unique to Native cultural traditions. The exemplar stories are laminated, bound, and given as gifts to an area elementary school with a primarily Native student body. Student authors read the stories to the children, and the books become part of the children's classroom library. The children learn cultural traditions from a young age and see their mentors (often Native students as well) as role models and writers. The authors learn the skills to develop their stories from conception to publication to presentation.Cultural Children's Story Video Lesson

Subject:
Character Education
Early Learning
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
World Languages
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
05/07/2018
Native American Dolls
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This lesson focuses on Native doll makers and how their work is keeping old traditions and developing new ones.  Students are encouraged to examine photographs of dolls from the museum's collections and to connect them to the diverse cultures, communities, and environments they represent.

Subject:
American Indian Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
Date Added:
04/20/2016
Native American Literature: The Evolution of Native American Representations in Film
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I include this assignment in my 11-12 Grade Native American Literature class. I usually introduce this unit after students have read the short story "This is What it Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona," by Sherman Alexie (Form his book The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven). The story (along with pieces of his other short stories) was the inspiration for the 1998 film Smoke Signals, one of the first authentic films to examine the humor, pain, loss and struggle of reservation life.After reading the story and watching the film, students write about what makes the film authentic and how forgiveness plays into the ability to move on.We then watch the documentary film Reel Injun (2009), chronicling the evolution of Native American portrayals in film. Next, students have the opportunity to discuss the attributes of authentic Native American depictions in film and what aspects of Native culture they would like to see in film.Finally, we finish the unit by looking at the impact of stereotypes in film, especially children's films, and students watch the Disney film Pocahantas (2005) through the lens of a movie critic and write a movie review based on the film, focusing on the authenticity of racial and cultural portrayals.Video Lesson: The Evolution of Native American Representations in Film

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Literature
Reading Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
05/18/2018
Native American Literature for High School
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Native American Literature for High School Grades Mike Mestelle from Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua, WI and Carol Amour from Lac du Flambeau, WI discuss literature written by Native American authors or about Native American people that would be appropriate for use in the high school grade classrooms for grades 9-12. Carol Amour represents the First Nations Traveling Resource Center, she works with the Indian Community School of Milwaukee in Franklin, WI, and has worked with the George W. Brown Museum in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reference Material
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Literature for Middle School Grades
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Native American Literature for Middle School Grades Mike Mestelle from Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua, WI and Carol Amour from Lac du Flambeau, WI discuss literature written by Native American authors or about Native American people that would be appropriate for use in the Middle School grade classrooms for grades 6, 7, and 8. Carol Amour represents the First Nations Traveling Resource Center, she works with the Indian Community School of Milwaukee in Franklin, WI, and has worked with the George W. Brown Museum in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reference Material
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Literature for Primary Grades
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Native American Literature for Primary Grades

Mike Mestelle from Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua, WI and Carol Amour from Lac du Flambeau, WI discuss literature written by Native American authors or about Native American people that would be appropriate for use in primary grade classrooms. Carol Amour represents the Traveling Resource Center, she works with the Indian Community School of Milwaukee in Franklin, WI, and has worked with the George W. Brown Museum in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reference Material
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Literature for the Intermediate Grades
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Native American Literature for the Intermediate Grades Mike Mestelle from Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua, WI and Carol Amour from Lac du Flambeau, WI discuss literature written by Native American authors or about Native American people that would be appropriate for use in the intermediate grade classrooms for grades 3, 4, and 5. Carol Amour represents the First Nations Traveling Resource Center, she works with the Indian Community School of Milwaukee in Franklin, WI, and has worked with the George W. Brown Museum in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reference Material
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Resistance
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The freedom to resist authority and government in the United States has been a very important right throughout our history. Resistance of the government of Great Britain is what founded our country with the signing of the Declaration of Independence and the winning of the Revolutionary War. Native American people have resisted the U.S. government’s attempts to assimilate them into mainstream culture, the termination of reservations, and to exterminate them as a race of people. That isn’t a process that is confined only to history, it still occurs in many instances in today’s world. This lesson is meant to teach students several historical examples of Native American Resistance and then to investigate recent examples on their own through research and presentation.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
Mike Mestelle
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native American Veterans Tribute
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The Native American Veterans Tribute is a slideshow project in Native American Literature class that corresponds with the Veterans Day Assembly at our high school. Veterans who are invited to the assembly are served breakfast and watch the slideshow in the Commons. Our class slideshow is incorporated into the presentation that day. It allows students to recognize relatives or or other Native military veterans and pay tribute to them.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Native People of Wisconsin
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Native People of Wisconsin explores the Native Nations in Wisconsin, including their histories and cultural traditions. Readers will use the text’s maps, illustrations, and photographs to investigate how rapid change like the arrival of Europeans impacted Native culture. Profiles of young people from each Wisconsin First Nation also help students learn about life today.

Chapters include Early History, European Arrivals, The Menominee Nation, The Ho-Chunk Nation, The Ojibwe Nation, The Potawatomi Nation, The Oneida Nation, Stockbridge-Munsee Community of Mohican Indians, The Brothertown Indian Nation, and Urban Indians

A detailed teaching guide complete with printable maps, student activity books, and comprehension activities is included.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Textbook
Author:
University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
Wisconsin Public Television
Date Added:
12/12/2017
Native People of Wisconsin
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An essential title for the upper elementary classroom, "Native People of Wisconsin" fills the need for accurate and authentic teaching materials about Wisconsin's Indian Nations. Based on her research for her award-winning title for adults, "Indian Nations of Wisconsin: Histories of Endurance and Survival," author Patty Loew has tailored this book specifically for young readers.

"Native People of Wisconsin" tells the stories of the twelve Native Nations in Wisconsin, including the Native people's incredible resilience despite rapid change and the impact of European arrivals on Native culture. Young readers will become familiar with the unique cultural traditions, tribal history, and life today for each nation.

Complete with maps, illustrations, and a detailed glossary of terms, this highly anticipated new edition includes two new chapters on the Brothertown Indian Nation and urban Indians, as well as updates on each tribe's current history and new profiles of outstanding young people from every nation.

Also Available, Native People of Wisconsin Teachers Guide: https://wisconsinfirstnations.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Native-People-of-Wisconsin.pdf

Subject:
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Social Studies
American Indian Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
Patty Loew
Date Added:
08/30/2018
Native Tribes of Wisconsin:  Southern Tribes
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This unit focuses on the southern tribes of Wisconsin. Students will learn about the location of each tribe. They will also learn about a brief history of the tribes. Students will be asked to do some of the research on their own . This unit contains links to two individual lessons focusing on the Brothertown and Potawatomi band of Native Americans. Each lesson contains links to necessary material.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
Jolene Arndt
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Negro and White Exclusion Towns and Other Observations in Oklahoma and Indian Territory by Frank G. Speck
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The book collects together and republishes a set of essays by Frank G. Speck that were originally issued as separate articles in The Southern Workman. The papers, which were written early in Speck's career, during the period 1907-1911, draw upon his first-hand observations in the Indian and Oklahoma Territories on the eve of Oklahoma statehood. In contrast to his more dispassionate ethnographic writings, which were published in venues read primarily by professional anthropologists and folklorists, these essays were published for a popular audience in the journal of the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, an important college serving African American and Native American students. Reflecting the sensibilities of Speck and his anthropological circle at the time, these brief essays are accessible, provocative and sometimes biting in tone and represent the work of a young scholar seeking to develop a public, progressive, critical and engaged stance relative to the social problems faced by the peoples--particularly Native American and African American peoples--of Oklahoma and of the United States more broadly. For modern readers, the essays are little utilized sources for the study of Oklahoma, Freedmen, and Muscogee (Creek) Indian cultural history. They also deepen historical understandings of Speck and his work and enrich scholarly knowledge of early efforts at developing anthropology as a means of cultural critique. Under U.S. copyright law, these essays are now in the public domain and is being republished on this basis.

Subject:
Geography
Sociology and Anthropology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Frank G. Speck
Jason Baird Jackson
Date Added:
10/16/2017
Remix
Regalia Scavenger Hunt
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This activity can be used with students of all ages and grades into Middle School considering their background knowledge or lack thereof.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Author:
Linda White
Date Added:
10/18/2019