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American Political Thought, Spring 2004
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This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Song, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2004
American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices, Fall 2007
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Explores the changing roles, ethical conflicts, and public perceptions of science and scientists in American society from World War II to the present. Studies specific historical episodes focusing on debates between scientists and the contextual factors influencing their opinions and decisions. Topics include the atomic bomb project, environmental controversies, the Challenger disaster, biomedical research, genetic engineering, (mis)use of human subjects, scientific misconduct and whistleblowing.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Nutrition Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Foley, Brendan
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Free Speech Essentials: Critical Debates
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In this activity and set or resources from the Newseum ED, students grapple with free speech-related conflicts and controversies using real-life scenarios. They deepen their understanding by taking a position and supporting their arguments with evidence from a gallery of print and visual sources.

The lesson requires a free registration for Nesweum ED resources.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Newseum ED
Date Added:
06/29/2022
Harm Reduction - Heroin Epidemic
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Students will learn about the four pillars of Drug Strategies our society uses to prevent, reduce the number of addicts, and the harm they place on our society; from deaths, disease transmission, crime, cost, etc.  Once students understand each pillar and how these steps help prevent addictions they will focus on the forth pillar which is "Harm Reduction".  Harm Reduction is very contraversal and fairly new in our society, especially with the Heroin Epidemic we are facing in our society.  Harm reduction programs and practices aim to reduce the harms associated with the use of drugs in people unable or unwilling to stop.  Harm reduction programs focus on limiting the risks and harms associated with unsafe drug use (HIV transmission, viral hepatitis, and death from overdose), decrease the cost on society and petty crime.  Students will form personal opinions on three different types of Harm Reduction practices around the world and they work as a group to debate their view point. 

Subject:
Health Science
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Tara VanCaster
Author:
Tara VanCaster
Date Added:
03/28/2018
Principles and Practice of Science Communication, Spring 2006
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Develop skills as science communicators through projects and analysis of theoretical principles. Case studies explore the emergence of popular science communication over the past two centuries and consider the relationships among authors, audiences and media. Project topics are identified early in the term and students work with MIT Museum staff. Projects may include physical exhibits, practical demonstrations, or scripts for public programs.

Subject:
Business and Information Technology
Fine Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Durant, John
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Pros and Cons of Controversial Issues
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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This website offers a free, reliable, and easily accessible source of information that shows both sides of today's controversial issues. It is created by a nonprofit public charity and has been online since 2004. The mission statement of this site is: "Promoting critical thinking, education, and informed citizenship by presenting controversial issues in a straightforward, nonpartisan, primarily pro-con format." The site follows strict guidelines for bias and strives to ensure that even the graphic and color choices won't sway you to one side of a topic or the other.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Reference Material
Provider:
ProCon.org - an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit public charity
Date Added:
11/11/2015
Remix
Resource Extraction (Sand Mining) Town Hall Meeting
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CC BY-NC
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This resource provides a class activity based on a “Town Hall Meeting” discussion/debate on resource extraction using sand mining in Wisconsin as a case study. The activity is designed for a lower-level university course. The objective is to engage students in a lively discussion of different perspectives on the significance of resource extraction held by various stakeholder groups in Wisconsin. It is based on stakeholders within Trempealeau County, but many are also found elsewhere and could readily be adapted to any location within the state. Students divide into representative groups, work collaboratively to explore the diversity of perspectives, and present these during an online synchronous meeting.

Subject:
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Cynthia Berlin
Date Added:
06/29/2020
The Science Essay, Spring 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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" The science essay uses science to think about the human condition; it uses humanistic thinking to reflect on the possibilities and limits of science and technology. In this class we read and practice writing science essays of varied lengths and purposes. We will read a wide variety of science essays, ranging across disciplines, both to learn more about this genre and to inspire your own writing. This semester's reading centers on "The Dark Side," with essays ranging from Alan Lightman's "Prisoner of the Wired World" through Robin Marantz Henig's cautionary account of nano-technology ("Our Silver-Coated Future") to David Quammen's investigation of diseases that jump from animals to humans ("Deadly Contact")."

Subject:
Business and Information Technology
Fine Arts
Ecology
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Boiko, Karen
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Slavery's Opponents and Defenders
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This lesson allows students to explore the different sides associated with the issue of slavery. It can be used for either cross-content lessons between English and Social Studies, as part of an argument unit in English, or as part of a larger unit in Social Studies. The learning objectives for the lesson are that students are able to identify those who are for and against slavery, understand how people used the U.S. Constitution to support their reasons for/against slavery, and the economic argument for or against slavery.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Reference Material
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Date Added:
12/28/2015