Search Resources

6 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • National Endowment for the Humanities
Dramatizing History with Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson plan's goal is to examine the ways in which Miller interpreted the facts of the witch trials and successfully dramatized them. Our inquiry into this matter will be guided by aesthetic and dramatic concerns as we attempt to interpret history and examine Miller's own interpretations of it. In this lesson, students will examine some of Miller's historical sources: biographies of key players (the accused and the accusers) and transcripts of the Salem Witch trials themselves. The students will also read a summary of the historical events in Salem and study a timeline. The students will then read The Crucible itself.

Subject:
Literature
Fine Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment
Date Added:
10/10/2017
Introducing Metaphors Through Poetry
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Many students begin to learn about metaphors well before entering high school. This lesson assumes that students will have a basic understanding of what metaphors are; however it is designed to help students begin to engage with metaphors on a deeper and more abstract level. The lesson will begin with a poem containing metaphors accessible at all levels, and with each poem the lesson will progress in difficulty, so that teachers will find material to suit their classes at all skill levels.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Date Added:
05/05/2016
Not Only Paul Revere: Other Riders of the American Revolution
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating

Paul Revere's ride is the most famous event of its kind in American history. But other Americans made similar rides during the American Revolution. Who were these men and women? Why were their rides important? Do they deserve to be better known?

Help your students develop a broader understanding of the Revolutionary War as they learn about some less well known but no less colorful rides that occurred in other locations. Give your students the opportunity to immortalize these "other riders" in verse as Longfellow did for Paul Revere. Heighten your students' skills in reading texts critically and making defendable judgments based on them.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment
Date Added:
11/01/2017
The Question of American Empire
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This lesson will introduce the students to the challenges of American foreign policy in the late 19 century and specifically to the political debate over whether the United States should acquire further territory and/or become a European-style empire. With the help of primary source documents students will debate this issue to help them come to their own assessment of the idea of an American Empire. (Taken directly from website)

Subject:
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Date Added:
10/05/2016
Slavery's Opponents and Defenders
Rating

This lesson allows students to explore the different sides associated with the issue of slavery. It can be used for either cross-content lessons between English and Social Studies, as part of an argument unit in English, or as part of a larger unit in Social Studies. The learning objectives for the lesson are that students are able to identify those who are for and against slavery, understand how people used the U.S. Constitution to support their reasons for/against slavery, and the economic argument for or against slavery.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Reference Material
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Date Added:
12/28/2015
Using Textual Clues to Understand “A Christmas Carol
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

In Lesson 1, students focus on the first stave of the novel as they identify the meanings of words and phrases that may be unfamiliar to them. This activity facilitates close examination of and immersion in the text and leads to an understanding of Scrooge before his ghostly experiences. In Lesson 2, students examine Scrooge’s experiences with the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future and discover how Dickens used both direct and indirect characterization to create a protagonist who is more than just a stereotype. In Lesson 3, students focus on stave 5 as they identify and articulate themes that permeate the story.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Date Added:
10/30/2014