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  • WI.SS.Hist3.b.m - Apply historical perspectives to describe differing viewpoints of curr...
Lesson Plan: The Second Amendment: Siege at Waco
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This 14-minute video shows students how the federal government’s botched raid on the compound of the Branch Davidian religious sect in 1993 gave rise to a nationwide militia movement of people advocating an expansive and individualistic interpretation of the Second Amendment. Students will learn how this movement included terrorists like Timothy McVeigh as well as lawful activists, many of whom continue to influence the national conversation on gun rights. Including interviews with militia activists as well as their opponents, the video provides students with context and insight on a defining cultural and political moment in the tug-of-war between individual rights and government powers. Useful for any lesson introducing Second Amendment controversies, the video illustrates why the right of individuals to own firearms remains one of the most contentious issues in American government.

Content Advisory:
This video includes footage of gun violence during a law enforcement raid that left 80 people dead.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
RetroReport
Date Added:
06/05/2023
Lesson Plan: Why Supreme Court Confirmations Have Become So Bitter: Mini-Lesson
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Public Domain
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This 10-minute video delves into how the nature of Supreme Court nominations have changed since the defeat of Robert Bork. As President Biden makes his first Supreme Court nomination, he is hoping for bipartisan support for nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson. Recent history of Supreme Court nominations have yielded bitter battles and guarded answers from nominees on their views of important legal issues.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
RetroReport
Date Added:
06/05/2023
A Lesson in Resiliency From the Bataan Death March – Wisconsin Veterans Museum
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Oral history and article of Herb Hanneman, a Wisconsin survivor, of the Batman Death March

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Wisconsin Veteran's Mueseum
Date Added:
08/04/2022
Martin Luther King Jr Day
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Enhance your classroom experience on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day with these teacher-tested lessons from the nationally recognized We the People: The Citizen & the Constitution curriculum. These materials will help inform your students about the national struggle for civil rights and equal protection under the law.

Subject:
Civics and Government
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Center for Civics Education
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Native Americans in World War II
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Overview / Description: This unit will examine the participation of Native Americans in World War II and their impact on the overall war effort. It will also look at the Native American perspective on the war and their participation. Guiding Questions: Why did Native Americans participate in WWII?What roles did Native Americans play in WWII?  How many Native Americans participated in WWII and what impact did they have on the overall war effort? In what ways did Native American participation in WWII connect to and/or change their cultural identity? What are some of the perspectives related to Native American participation in WWII? Learning goals/objectives:   Analyze primary and secondary sources related to the topic of Native American participation in World War II. Using information gathered, construct an argument about the presence of Native Americans in World War II. 

Subject:
American Indian Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jessica Pingel
Date Added:
05/10/2019
Native Americans in the Great Depression
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Overview / Description: This unit will examine the experience of Native Americans during the Great Depression in the United States. It will integrate comparisons with the experiences of other minority groups as well as exposing students to primary source documents related to the government policies which were adopted toward Native Americans during the time. Guiding Questions: What were the US government’s policies toward Native Americans leading up to the Great Depression? Were they fair? What was FDR’s response to the struggles of Native Americans during the Great Depression? What was the Native American experience like during the Great Depression and how did it compare to other minority groups? Learning goals/objectives:    Analyze primary and secondary sources related to the experience of Native Americans during the Great Depression. Summarize the experiences of Native Americans during the Great Depression. 

Subject:
American Indian Studies
Sociology and Anthropology
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jessica Pingel
Date Added:
06/13/2019
OER Project Teaching Guide
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This teaching guide from the OER Project outlines their courses, PD, and other resources.

The OER Project is a coalition of educators and historians committed to boosting student engagement and achievement through transformational social studies programs. By empowering classroom teachers with better curricula, content, and a vibrant community, we deliver more compelling, impactful, and usable histories. “OER” stands for open educational resources. When you grab a free worksheet off Pinterest for your tenth graders, that’s an OER resource. We recognize the value of OER resources, but want to go beyond the typical content repository approach—we aim to improve OER by providing coherency, support, and community.

Currently, the OER Project offers two courses—Big History Project (BHP) and World History Project (WHP)—both of which are completely free, online, and adaptable to different standards and classroom needs. Unlike textbooks, lesson websites, and other commercial products, everything has been purposely built to truly empower teachers and leave traditional history courses in—sorry for the pun—the past. We also offer short, standalone courses for those who want to try the OER Project approach, but aren’t yet ready to take on a full history course. Our current standalone options include Project X, a course that uses data to explore historical trends to help make predictions about the future; Project Score, a course that uses writing tools and the use of Score, a free, online essay-scoring service to help support student writing; and Climate Project, an evidence-based overview of the global carbon problem that culminates in students developing a plan of action they can implement locally

Subject:
American Indian Studies
Ancient History
Archaeology
Civics and Government
Economics
Ethnic Studies
Geography
Religious Studies
Social Studies
Sociology and Anthropology
U.S. History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Assessment Item
Curriculum Map
Formative Assessment
Full Course
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reference Material
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
OER Project
Date Added:
01/30/2023
PBS News Hour Martin Luther King Jr. Day Classroom Resources
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Use the following NewsHour Classroom resources to examine King’s impact on civil rights and his ongoing legacy. Lessons include a deep dive anayisis of the “I have a dream” speech and the impact of Dr, King’s work on current evens

Subject:
Civics and Government
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS NewsHour
Victoria Pasquantonio
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Progressive Era Political Cartoons
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Cartoons in Sunday comic strips make us laugh. Political cartoons in the front section of the newspaper challenge us to think.

Because political cartoons present a particular point of view or story through symbolism and caricature, they are a particularly effective method for teaching history.

By interpreting political cartoons, students are encouraged to discover different points of view on the same historical event.

The three political cartoons in this section focus on Robert M. La Follette; they offer an additional opportunity to explore the progressive era in Wisconsin. Suggested activities, brief histories of each cartoon, a one-page biography of La Follette, and an introduction to cartoon analysis are also included.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Wisconsin Historical Society
Date Added:
07/01/2022
Protests For Racial Justice: A Long History
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Public Domain
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In 1967, riots triggered by episodes of police brutality and harassment of African Americans erupted in over 150 U.S. cities. President Johnson asked Congress to investigate, and the result was the Kerner Commission report, which stated: “Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white, separate and unequal.” The report highlighted shortages of jobs, inadequate education, discrimination, and harsh police tactics. In this lesson students will look at the report’s findings, and how ignoring them had an impact that continues today.

Content Advisory:
This video includes footage of police violence.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
RetroReport
Date Added:
06/06/2023
Recollection Wisconsin Lesson plans and ideas for Educators
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Recollection Wisconsin brings together digital cultural heritage resources from Wisconsin libraries, archives, museums and historical societies and shares them with the world in partnership with the Digital Public Library of America. The webpage provides different 4-8ideas for teaching about Wisconsin history.

Subject:
American Indian Studies
Civics and Government
Education
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Recollection WIsconsin
Date Added:
07/18/2022
SURVIVING IMPRISONMENT IN THE PACIFIC; THE STORY OF AMERICAN POWS
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By reading primary sources outlining the rights of prisoners of war, along with the primary accounts of American prisoners of war held by the Japanese, students should critically assess the nature of violations committed by the Japanese forces during World War II. Through this assessment, the students should be able to determine the specific ways Japanese forces violated the rights of American POWs. Students should also consider how the Geneva Conventions, and Japan’s lack of ratification, apply to the debates that surrounded Japanese war crimes at the postwar Tokyo Trials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
World War II Mueseum
Date Added:
08/04/2022
To Sign or Not to Sign
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On Constitution Day, students will examine the role of the people in shaping the United States Constitution. First, students will respond to a provocative statement posted in the room. They will then watch a video that gives a brief explanation of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, or listen as the video transcript is read aloud. A Constitution poster is provided so students can examine Article VII and discuss it as a class.
The elementary and middle school educator will then
guide students through a read-aloud play depicting two Constitutional Convention delegates who disagreed about ratifying the Constitution.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Education
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
National Constitution Center
Date Added:
07/06/2022
Veterans Day and the meaning of sacrifice
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Use this PBS NewsHour lesson plan to help students understand the significance of Veterans Day and the meaning of sacrifice. Students will identify important veterans in their lives, examine an interactive timeline of military history and study issues facing veterans today

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS News Hour
Victoria Pasquantonio
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Why Do We (Still) Celebrate Columbus Day?
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In this lesson, students will address misconceptions they likely have about Christopher Columbus and the colonization of what is now the United States. Students will watch a video to dispel some of the myths associated with Columbus and gain a better understanding of how Columbus Day became a national holiday. Students will then read interviews with Indigenous youth and identify the reasons that celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead of Columbus Day matters to them. This lesson can be taught on Columbus Day or leading up to it.

Subject:
American Indian Studies
Civics and Government
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Women’s Suffrage in the United States – Teach a Girl to Lead
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The goal of this module is to provide resources and information about the history of women’s vote in the U.S. Looking at the women’s suffrage movement provides a framework for exploring the changing role of women in politics and society in the 19th and 20th centuries. The history of suffrage offers an opportunity to examine women’s roles at critical points in the nation’s history, and to think about the impact of women’s voting behavior on politics in our time.
Activities and discussion questions are designed to explore the changing role of women in society and in politics. The module includes ideas for developing lessons on women’s suffrage and integrating the issue of suffrage into lessons on US history and politics, and to consider the impact of full suffrage on politics and society today.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Education
Elementary Education
Gender Studies
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Rutgers Eagleton Instutue of Poltics Teach a Girl to Lead
Date Added:
08/02/2022