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  • WI.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4
Remix
Argument Essay Based on To Kill a Mockingbird
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After reading To Kill a Mockingbird, students will continue to study the theme of taking a stand as they finish the novel. They will develop their argument writing skills through scaffolded writing lessons, culminating in a literary analysis essay in which they argue whether or not it made sense, based on Atticus’s character, for him to have taken a stand and defend Tom Robinson.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Marcy Siolka
Date Added:
08/21/2019
Blogtopia: Blogging about Your Own Utopia
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Copyright Restricted
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After studying utopian literature, students design their own utopian society, publishing the explanation of their ideal world on a blog. As they blog about their utopia, students establish the habits, practices, and organizing social structures that citizens will follow in their utopian societies. They begin by brainstorming ideas about what a perfect society would be like and then, in groups, begin to plan their project. Next, they become familiar with the blogging process, including legal guidelines and the specific site they will be using. Over several class sessions, students work on their blogs comparing their work to a rubric. Finally, after students visit one another's blogs and provide constructive and supportive feedback, they reflect on their own work. The lesson plan includes alternative handouts for classrooms where computer or blog access is limited. In this alternative, students complete the same basic activities, but publish their work using a Flip Book.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
11/12/2015
Remix
Building Evidence-Based Arguments Unit: Search Warrant
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This unit focuses on aspects of argumentation
involving evidence, reasoning, and logic, rather
than on persuasive writing and speaking. Students are first expected to understand objectively a
complex issue through exploratory inquiry and
close reading of information on the topic, then
study multiple perspectives on the issue before
they establish their own position. From their
reading and research, they are asked to craft an
argumentative plan that explains and supports
their position, acknowledges the perspectives and
positions of others, and uses evidence gleaned
through close reading and analysis to support
their claims.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
Stephanie Rau
Date Added:
08/21/2019
Censorship in the Classroom: Understanding Controversial Issues
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The lesson and activities teach students to recognize and explore bias and media stereotyping and be able to identify and analyze propaganda techniques in magazine and//or TV advertising.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
English Language Arts
Information and Technology Literacy
Social Studies
Material Type:
Curriculum Map
Diagram/Illustration
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Reference Material
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
12/28/2015
Comparing a Literary Work to Its Film Interpretation
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Copyright Restricted
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In this lesson, high school students look critically at the literary work "The Pit and the Pendulum" by Edgar Allan Poe and its 1961 film interpretation. They use prediction strategies to form and refine their opinions about the story line progression in each work. They read the short story, screen the film, discuss reactions to both works, and plan and write a persuasive essay analyzing the validity of the film interpretation. This lesson is ideally suited for students who have experience with persuasive writing, and it can be adapted to work with any literature-film pairing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment Item
Diagram/Illustration
Formative Assessment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
International Literacy Association/National Counil Teacher of English
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Finding Common Ground: Using Logical, Audience-Specific Arguments
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When students write argumentative or persuasive essays, they often ignore the viewpoints of their opponents, the potential readers of their essays. In this minilesson, students respond to a hypothetical situation by writing about their position on the subject. After sharing their thoughts with the class, students consider the opposite point of view and write about arguments for that position. They then compare their position with that of their potential audience, looking for areas of overlap. They then revise their arguments, with the audience's point of view and areas of commonality in mind. Examining the opposing view allows students to better decide how to counter their opponent logically, perhaps finding common ground from which their arguments might grow. Thus, the activity becomes a lesson not only in choosing arguments but also in anticipating audience reaction and adapting to it.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Provider:
NCTE
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Fishbowl Discussion Project; Into the Wild
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Copyright Restricted
Rating

A fishbowl discussion is made up of a group that carries on a thoughtful discussion in front of an audience. We will have a group of chairs in the middle of the room for your group to sit on. We will start the discussion by asking one question. Your group must discuss and answer this particular question thoroughly. After that, your group should choose other topics to discuss—consider discussing themes, characters, foreshadowing, setting, connections, etc that connect to your given question. One chair will be open with your group to allow any audience member to join in at any time to ask a question, challenge, or comment. As an individual, you will be required to provide textual support to back up your answers. Following the discussions, you will reflect on your experience.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment Item
Formative Assessment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Self Assessment
Provider:
Jennifer Young
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Ghosts and Fear in Language Arts: Exploring the Ways Writers Scare Readers
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What is scary, and why does it fascinate us? How do writers and storytellers scare us? This lesson plan invites students to answer these questions by exploring their own scary stories and scary short stories and books. The lesson culminates in a Fright Fair, where students share scary projects that they have created, including posters, multimedia projects, and creative writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Alternate Assessment
Formative Assessment
Interactive
Interim/Summative Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Reading
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Grade 10 ELA Module 1
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In Module 10.1, students engage with literature and nonfiction texts and explore how complex characters develop through their interactions with each other, and how these interactions develop central ideas such as parental and communal expectations, self-perception and performance, and competition and learning from mistakes.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/04/2014
Grade 9 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students will read, discuss, and analyze contemporary and classic texts, focusing on how complex characters develop through interactions with one another and how authors structure text to accomplish that development. There will be a strong emphasis on reading closely and responding to text dependent questions, annotating text, and developing academic vocabulary in context.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/02/2013
Grade 9 ELA Module 2
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In this module, students engage with literature and nonfiction texts that develop central ideas of guilt, obsession, and madness, among others. Building on work with evidence-based analysis and debate in Module 1, students will produce evidence-based claims to analyze the development of central ideas and text structure. Students will develop and strengthen their writing by revising and editing, and refine their speaking and listening skills through discussion-based assessments.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature Using Graphics
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This lesson is used for discussion of a novel read by the whole class. Working individually and in groups, using symbols, drawings, shapes, and colors, alongside words and quotations, students construct a graphic of their section of the novel using an online tool and then on newsprint or butcher paper with crayons or markers. When all groups have completed their graphics, they will present them to the class, explaining why they chose the elements they used. Finished graphics can be displayed on a class bulletin board, on walls, or on a Web page. Finally, students will write an individual essay analyzing one element of the novel.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
NCTE
Date Added:
11/03/2015
Investigate Africa
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This webfolio is a follow-up assignment to an Honors English unit on Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achiebe. In this webfolio, students will take on the role of social scientists interested in learning more about the life of Africans in different parts of the continent. They will each have different aspects of African culture and life to research.The webfolio format emphasizes the power of teamwork and the Internet to learn all about an area of Africa. Each team will learn about one region of the continent, and then they will come together to get a better understanding of Africa as a whole by participating in and observing classroom presentations. The culminating project combines individual research and informational genre format into a first-person travel diary, imagining an actual trip through each region of Africa.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Learning Task
Reading
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Unit of Study
Provider:
Weebly
Date Added:
01/18/2017
Julius Caesar Research Project
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Copyright Restricted
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You will work in groups of 4-5 people; each group will be responsible for researching and presenting their information pertaining to the times of Julius Caesar to the class through a PowerPoint presentation. Make sure you go in depth and truly analyze your topic—you are responsible for teaching the class your information. Do not simply read from your slides—you want to SHOW us you understand your topic through the information you present. Your PowerPoint should be an overview of your topic—you should have information [notecards] with you to help you teach more information to the class. Topics and partners will be assigned to you.  Each person in the group is responsible for speaking during the presentation; make sure you organize PRIOR to the presentation who will be doing what. There will be responsibilities of the group, in order to earn the group grade, and responsibilities of you as an individual, to earn an individual grade. Everyone will be quizzed on the material at the end.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Information and Technology Literacy
Material Type:
Alternate Assessment
Assessment Item
Interactive
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Self Assessment
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Jennifer Young
Date Added:
06/16/2015