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  • WI.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.1
3-2-1 Vocabulary: Learning Filmmaking Vocabulary by Making Films
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Bring the vocabulary of film to life through the processes of filmmaking. Students learn terminology and techniques simultaneously as they plan, film, and edit a short video.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Fine Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
11/01/2017
6th Grade Historical Literacy Units
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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5th Grade Historical Literacy Curriculum outlines the content of social-studies integrated units taught within the readers' and writers' workshop framework and taught daily for 90 minutes. Each six week unit contains standards, teaching points, vocabulary, and assessments. Readers' and writers' workshop naturally differentiates for all learners. By June of 2020, each unit will have a slide deck associated with it that contains the teaching points, integrated grammar work, vocabulary, and strategies for partner practice. Our district places careful emphasis on vocabulary, as we have a high percentage of English Language Learners.

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Curriculum Map
Formative Assessment
Author:
Jennifer Mortensen
Date Added:
09/26/2019
Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Special Education)
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This is a breakdown of the novel "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" and is set up to move slow.  It is set up so that students are able to recall events within each reading as they are directly taken from the book.  This could be printed off for students to fill out or could be up loaded to google classroom for students to fill in.  

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Teri Bohm
Date Added:
03/20/2018
Grade 6 ELA Module 1
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
Literature Circle Collaboration and Participation Rubrics
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These rubrics can be used when students are working in literature circle groups to assess their collaboration and public speaking skills. There is one rubric for the teacher to assess student preparedness and contribution to the group as well as speaking and listening skills. Another rubric has been adapted to allow for students to peer-assess and self-assess at the end of a literature circle cycle. The rubrics provide clear expectations for group collaboration aligned to the Common Core State Standards for Speaking & Listening. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment Item
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Self Assessment
Provider:
Maggie Schumacher
Author:
Maggie Schumacher
Date Added:
03/28/2018
Text Structures-Informational Writing/Mesopotamia Unit
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Educational Use
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This 18 day unit explicitly teaches text structures, summary, text features, reading informational text about Mesopotamia, and writing a book about Mesopotamia. Instruction moves from high scaffolding to moderate scaffolding to independent practice as students become familiar with the various text structures, how to identify them, what graphic organizer will work with each text structure, how to use notes recorded in graphic organizers to write summaries, and how to compile an informational book. Mesopotamia is the content used as an anchor.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Fine Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
11/01/2017
Using Picture Books to Teach Setting Development in Writing Workshop
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After reading Water Hole Waiting by Jane Kurtz and Christopher Kurtz, or another book that has a well-developed setting, students work as a class to chart the use of the three elements of setting in the story, using specific words and examples from the text. Students then discuss the techniques that the book’s author used to develop the setting, making observations and drawing conclusions about how authors make the setting they write about vivid and believable. Next, students work in small groups to analyze the setting in another picture book, using an online graphic organizer. Finally, students apply what they have learned about how authors develop good settings to a piece of their own writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Literacy Association/ National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
01/01/2015