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  • WI.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1
6th Grade Historical Literacy Units
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5th Grade Historical Literacy Curriculum outlines the content of social-studies integrated units taught within the readers' and writers' workshop framework and taught daily for 90 minutes. Each six week unit contains standards, teaching points, vocabulary, and assessments. Readers' and writers' workshop naturally differentiates for all learners. By June of 2020, each unit will have a slide deck associated with it that contains the teaching points, integrated grammar work, vocabulary, and strategies for partner practice. Our district places careful emphasis on vocabulary, as we have a high percentage of English Language Learners.

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Curriculum Map
Formative Assessment
Author:
Jennifer Mortensen
Date Added:
09/26/2019
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Careers in Agriculture
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This multi-disciplinary career exploration unit builds on lesson plans available through the Michigan Agriculture in the Classroom website. Students will spend a week investigating different aspects of agriculture careers, while incorporating skills from math, English, and social studies. The unit culminates in a "Day in the Life" summative writing assignment.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Student Guide
Author:
Lynn Aprill
Date Added:
01/16/2020
Close Reading Strategies with Informational Text
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This resource is a teacher guiding students through using close reading strategies to determine the main idea and details from an informational piece of text.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reference Material
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Date Added:
04/05/2017
DIY Literacy Video Series
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Kate and Maggie Roberts create a series of nine videos in connection with their book, DIY Literacy: Teaching Tools for Differentiation, Rigor, and Independence. From viewer problems and questions, the authors designed practical teaching examples.  The videos are light-hearted but offer strategies to encourage deeper reading in the classroom.  The authors model teaching strategies that answer classroom situations using a demonstration notebook. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
https://vimeo.com/user50344348
Date Added:
03/20/2018
Every Punctuation Mark Matters: A Minilesson on Semicolons
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Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "Letter from Birmingham Jail" demonstrates that even the smallest punctuation mark signals a stylistic decision, distinguishing one writer from another and enabling an author to move an audience. In this minilesson, students first explore Dr. King's use of semicolons and their rhetorical significance. They then apply what they have learned by searching for ways to follow Dr. King's model and use the punctuation mark in their own writing. Note that while this lesson refers to the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," any text which features rhetorically significant use of semicolons can be effective for this minilesson.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
11/17/2015
Grade 6 ELA Module 1
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In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
Grade 6 ELA Module 2A
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What are “rules to live by”? How do people formulate and use “rules” to improve their lives? How do people communicate these “rules” to others? In this module, students consider these questions as they read the novel Bud, Not Buddy, Steve Jobs’ 2005 commencement address at Stanford University, President Barack Obama’s Back-to-School Speech, “If” by Rudyard Kipling, and informational research texts. At the start of Unit 1, students launch their study of Bud, Not Buddy, establishing a set of routines for thinking, writing, and talking about Bud’s rules to live by. They read the novel closely for its figurative language and word choice, analyzing how these affect the tone and meaning of the text. In the second half of the unit, students engage in a close reading of the Steve Jobs speech, focusing on how Jobs develops his ideas at the paragraph, sentence, and word level. Students use details from the speech to develop claims about a larger theme. During Unit 2, students continue to explore the theme of “rules to live by” in the novel as well as through close reading of the poem “If” by Rudyard Kipling. Students analyze how the structure of a poem contributes to its meaning and theme. In a mid-unit assessment, students compare and contrast how Bud, Not Buddy and “If” address a similar theme. Unit 2 culminates with students writing a literary argument essay in which they establish a claim about how Bud uses his “rules”: to survive or to thrive. Students substantiate their claim using specific text-based evidence including relevant details and direct quotations from the novel. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to their own rules to live by and conduct a short research project. Students work in expert groups (research teams) to use multiple informational sources to research that topic. As a final performance task, students use their research to write an essay to inform about one important “rule to live by” supported with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, and examples.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
05/12/2013
Hoax or No Hoax? Strategies for Online Comprehension and Evaluation
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This activity offers resources to guide students through lessons on determining whether sites are hoaxes or real, a skill necessary in everyday life.  Students analyze and evaluate using a guided worksheet whether a website passes the criteria.  In the lesson, there are plenty of examples to use as models or a guided reading lesson.  Links and activity are engaging for students.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
03/24/2017
Mr. Schu Reads.blogspot.com/
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John Schumacher (aka Mr. Schu) is a blogger, a part-time lecturer at Rutgers University, and the Ambassador of School Libraries for Scholastic Book Fairs®. You could say every day is a giant book party for this teacher-librarian! In fact, Library Journal named him "The Xtreme Librarian" for the high level of exertion – along with some gears and stunts – he uses to get kids reading, and Instructor Magazinenamed him a Cool Teacher for redefining what it means to be a teacher-librarian.
This resource is a link to his Blog. The Blog hosts children's book trailers he has created. He explains "how" he created them.

Subject:
Business and Information Technology
English Language Arts
Information and Technology Literacy
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
John Schumacher (aka Mr. Schu)
Date Added:
04/21/2016
Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus (Evaluating web resources)
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Help Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus from Exrinction is a website dedicated to the survival of a unique species of octopus - or is it? How can we tell if a website is a credible source? Even if it looks good on the surface, is that information true? Use this website to teach students how to evaluate a website for it's usefulness and credibility.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Information and Technology Literacy
Material Type:
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Lyle Zapato
Date Added:
12/28/2015
Using THIEVES to Preview Nonfiction Texts
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These lessons will introduce students to the THIEVES strategy for previewing textbooks and non-fiction articles.  The acronym stands for:
T- Title
H - Headings
I - Introduction
E - Every first sentence in a paragraph
V - Visuals and Vocabulary
E - End of chapter questions
S - Summary
Teacher will model, students will practice with a partner and then use the strategy independently.  These short lessons could be applied to any textbook or article in a middle school classroom.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Provider:
ILA
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Zoom In
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Zoom In provides 18 guided lessons on historical events where students focus on reading primary and secondary documents closely, gathering evidence, and writing an argumentative or explanatory essay. Throughout the process students are asked to do the following:
Read documents closely and criticallyIdentify author's point of view and purposeEngage in higher-order, text-based discussionsWrite explanatory and argumentative essays grounded in evidence

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
Zoom In
Date Added:
12/13/2016