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  • WI.ELA-Literacy.RF.2.4
Adventures in Nonfiction: A Guided Inquiry Journey
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The activities in this lesson provide a foundation for using nonfiction resources for developing and answering questions about gathered information. Using a wide variety of nonfiction literature, students learn to sort and categorize books to begin the information-gathering process. Then, working with partners and groups, using pictures and text, students are guided through the process of gathering information, asking clarifying questions, and then enhancing the information with additional details. Students complete the lesson by collaboratively making “Question and Answer” books for the classroom library. This is a high-interest foundation builder for using nonfiction literature in research as well as for pleasure reading

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Read, Write, Think / International Literacy Association / National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Book Template- Newcomer EL
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource was created as part of the CESA #1 EL OER Project to help elementary newcomer EL students learn vocabulary about places around school. Using the given template, teachers and students can create a personalized book showcasing different rooms/parts of the school and the teachers/ school staff that they interact with throughout the day. After creating the book, emergent readers will have a pattern book containing their name and picture clues to help them practice reading skills.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Learning Task
Reading
Author:
Katie Kasper
Date Added:
08/02/2019
CESA #1 EL OER Project  -  Fluency Building
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Students will understand the five components of fluency- speed, pausing, inflection, phrasing, and expression and practice reading text the way the author intended. Through the use of a rubric, they will monitor their own growth over time.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Reference Material
Author:
Carolyn Hottinger
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Comparing Fiction and Nonfiction with "Little Red Riding Hood Text" Sets
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These lessons compare different versions of the fairy tale, Little Red Riding Hood, giving students an opportunity to talk about the similiarities and differences among the different stories.  Students are then introduced to non-fiction text about wolves to determine different perscpectives of the wolf as a villian in the stories.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
ILA
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Creating Question and Answer Books through Guided Research
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This mini unit walks students through the question/discovery process of nonfiction literature.  The first lesson encourages students to wonder while reading.  Then students research to find the answers to their questions.  They explore ways to show/write their new learning.  As a class the kids work to publish 1 or 2 classroom books on the research topic.  This is a great way to introduce the nonfiction unit and then let each student write thier own question book based on the process they used with the class book.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
02/01/2017
Engaging With Cause-and-Effect Relationships Through Creating Comic Strips
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In order to fully comprehend reading materials, students need to understand the cause-and-effect relationships that appear in a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts. In this lesson, students learn cause-and-effect relationships through the sharing of a variety of Laura Joffe Numeroff picture books in a Reader's Workshop format. Using online tools or a printed template, students create an original comic strip via the writing prompt, "If you take a (third) grader to."  Students use various kinds of art to illustrate their strip and publish and present their completed piece to peers in a read-aloud format.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Literacy Association
Date Added:
12/15/2016
Fact or Fiction: Learning About Worms Using Diary of a Worm
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Do worms live underground? Are they good diggers? Can they really read and write? As students read Doreen Cronin's Diary of a Worm in this lesson, they learn to separate the facts from the fictional details. Students begin the lesson by brainstorming what they know about worms. They then begin examining the book in layers. Four read-aloud sessions engage students by focusing attention on different features of the text in each session. In a whole-group setting, students explore the illustrations, fictional details, nonfiction details, and captions and speech bubbles. In this way, students are given concrete strategies that they can use to help differentiate narrative and informational elements in other books they read.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Literacy Association
Date Added:
11/12/2015
Junie B. Jones Introduces Literacy Mystery Boxes
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Junie B., as she insists on being called, is an opinionated, lively, character in Barbara Park's series of books, and she is sure to delight primary students. In this unit, the teacher reads aloud selections from Junie B., First Grader (at last!). Students discuss the text with a partner and then individually compose sentences about key events from the story. Each student also creates and adds items to a mystery box, or a box that holds items or pictures referenced in the story. After students have listened to the entire story, they use their mystery boxes to retell the story to a classmate. As a culminating activity, students use the mystery boxes and the sentences they composed to make a related stapleless book about the story.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
International Literacy Association
Date Added:
11/12/2015
UDL and Reading/Writing Workshop: Strategies for Developing Proficient Readers
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Our goal is for our students to become proficient readers and writers who display agency and independence. This interactive hyperdoc training module, about UDL and Reading Workshop, is designed to help educators develop an ever-growing toolkit of strategies that will remove barriers to learning and create options for how instruction is presented, how students express their ideas, and how we can engage students in their learning.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Language Education (ESL)
Special Education
English Language Arts
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Literature
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Diane Rozanski
Rachel Quill
Jennifer Breezee
Kimberly Dabney
Jeni Berthold
Kimberly Schiefelbein
Lisa Hedrick
Grant Wiselearn
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Using Assessment Notebooks in Reading
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A multi-age primary classroom teacher uses formative assessment as a barometer of student learning. She records anecdotal notes about her students' reading progress within an assessment notebook and references the notes for future instruction.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Provider:
Kentucky Educational Television
Date Added:
01/31/2017