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  • Composition and Rhetoric
Teaching Students About Copyright And Fair Use
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Copyright Restricted
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Students explore the legal and ethical dimensions of respecting creative work. First, they learn a basic foundation of legal principles and vocabulary related to copyright. They understand how such factors as the rules of copyright law, the values and intent of the original creator, and the audience and purpose should affect their decisions about using the creative work of others. Using the Mad Men Student Handout, students then apply these principles to a simulation activity in which they act as advertising executives who have to choose a photo for an ad campaign.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Information and Technology Literacy
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Nichole Niebur
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
03/10/2019
Vignette Unit
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource is a unit that integrates the ELA skills of vignette writing, formal interviewing skills, presentation skills, and technology. Instructional slides are includes as well as other resources to support this unit.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Information and Technology Literacy
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Patricia Sankey
Date Added:
04/01/2019
Wisconsin Indians Basic Research
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This is a basic research lesson to give students an opportunity to learn some basic information about Wisconsin Indian Tribes. For more in depth research, this lesson can be added to or changed.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Education
English Language Arts
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lesson
Date Added:
06/24/2019
Writing Activity for Sales Training -- How to Write a Website "About Us" Page
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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Your company website needs to come to life and teach site visitors about your products and the people behind them. In the following activity, you and your team will construct an “About Us” web page so anyone who visits the site will come away impressed.Learning outcome: Students will understand the value of an "About Us" web page and how to write about their business properly.----Special note: you have a sample pack activity that accompanies Danny Rubin's book, Wait, How Do I Write This Email?, a collection of 100+ templates for networking, the job search and LinkedIn.Each book features 40+ additional classroom activities on more in-demand topics, including:Email etiquetteNetworkingInternship/job search emailsResumeLinkedInPhone etiquetteSee the 100+ activities from the Rubin Education online curriculum (covers employability, business promotion and leadership)If you'd like to explore the additional material and learn about pricing, please fill out this short contact form and a Rubin Education learning specialist will follow up with you.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Business and Information Technology
Composition and Rhetoric
Family and Consumer Sciences
Health Science
Marketing, Management and Entrepreneurship
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Danny Rubin
Date Added:
06/20/2018
Writing in College: From Competence to Excellence | Open SUNY Textbooks
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Writing in College is designed for students who have largely mastered high-school level conventions of formal academic writing and are now moving beyond the five-paragraph essay to more advanced engagement with text. It is well suited to composition courses or first-year seminars and valuable as a supplemental or recommended text in other writing-intensive classes. It provides a friendly, down-to-earth introduction to professors’ goals and expectations, demystifying the norms of the academy and how they shape college writing assignments. Each of the nine chapters can be read separately, and each includes suggested exercises to bring the main messages to life. Students will find in Writing in College a warm invitation to join the academic community as novice scholars and to approach writing as a meaningful medium of thought and communication. With concise discussions, clear multidisciplinary examples, and empathy for the challenges of student life, Guptill conveys a welcoming tone. In addition, ...

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
Amy Guptill
Date Added:
01/19/2016
Writing with Shakespeare, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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William Shakespeare didn't go to college. If he time-traveled like Dr. Who, he would be stunned to find his words on a university syllabus. However, he would not be surprised at the way we will be using those words in this class, because the study of rhetoric was essential to all education in his day. At Oxford, William Gager argued that drama allowed undergraduates "to try their voices and confirm their memories, and to frame their speech and conform it to convenient action": in other words, drama was useful. Shakespeare's fellow playwright Thomas Heywood similarly recalled: In the time of my residence in Cambridge, I have seen Tragedies, Comedies, Histories, Pastorals and Shows, publicly acted…: this is held necessary for the emboldening of their Junior scholars, to arm them with audacity, against they come to be employed in any public exercise, as in the reading of Dialectic, Rhetoric, Ethic, Mathematic, the Physic, or Metaphysic Lectures. Such practice made a student able to "frame a sufficient argument to prove his questions, or defend any axioma, to distinguish of any Dilemma and be able to moderate in any Argumentation whatsoever" (Apology for Actors, 1612). In this class, we will use Shakespeare's own words to arm you "with audacity" and a similar ability to make logical, compelling arguments, in speech and in writing. Shakespeare used his ears and eyes to learn the craft of telling stories to the public in the popular form of theater. He also published two long narrative poems, which he dedicated to an aristocrat, and wrote sonnets to share "among his private friends" (so wrote Francis Meres in his Palladis Tamia, 1598). Varying his style to suit different audiences and occasions, and borrowing copiously from what he read, Shakespeare nevertheless found a voice all his own–so much so that his words are now, as his fellow playwright Ben Jonson foretold, "not of an age, but for all time." Reading, listening, analyzing, appreciating, criticizing, remembering: we will engage with these words in many ways, and will see how words can become ideas, habits of thought, indicators of emotion, and a means to transform the world.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Fine Arts
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Henderson, Diana
Date Added:
01/01/2010