Updating search results...

Search Resources

78 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Inquiry
Abraham Lincoln: Man versus Legend
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students interrogate their own assumptions about Abraham Lincoln in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of who Lincoln was. They investigate primary source documents in order to analyze the elements of Lincoln's life that have become legend and those that have been forgotten by history.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS Learning Media
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Act 31 Lesson Plan -- Indian Civil Rights Movement.pdf
Rating
0.0 stars

The following lesson is designed to help students explore the emergence of the American Indian Movement (c.1968 and beyond) in the context of the push for self-determination by native people, and within the broader movement for Civil Rights in American Society.

This resource would be appropriate for high school students, during a study of the Civil Rights Movement. It provides primary source materials for students to analyze using the APPARTS process.

This aligns to WI AIS Enduring Understanding #9 "American Indians and U.S. Citizenship".

Subject:
American Indian Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Reference Material
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Paul Rykken
Date Added:
04/08/2021
Adventures in Nonfiction: A Guided Inquiry Journey
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating
0.0 stars

The activities in this lesson provide a foundation for using nonfiction resources for developing and answering questions about gathered information. Using a wide variety of nonfiction literature, students learn to sort and categorize books to begin the information-gathering process. Then, working with partners and groups, using pictures and text, students are guided through the process of gathering information, asking clarifying questions, and then enhancing the information with additional details. Students complete the lesson by collaboratively making “Question and Answer” books for the classroom library. This is a high-interest foundation builder for using nonfiction literature in research as well as for pleasure reading

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Read, Write, Think / International Literacy Association / National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
06/16/2015
The Audacity of a Vote: Susan B. Anthony’s Arrest
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students analyze a daring challenge to the legal and social order of the time: Susan B. Anthony’s casting of an illegal ballot in the 1872 presidential election. Anthony was ultimately put on trial, convicted, and fined $100 for her “crime.” In this lesson, students close read an excerpt from Anthony’s speech Is It a Crime for Women to Vote? in which Anthony defended her actions. The speech, written prior to Anthony’s trial in 1873, contains many themes that resonate with contemporary debates about membership in American society. At a time when voter suppression, gerrymandering, and election interference dominate the headlines, this lesson prompts students to draw connections between the past and present, especially around acts of civil disobedience, the role of voting in a democracy, and the meaning of equality.

Subject:
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Facing History and Ourselves
Date Added:
08/02/2022
Becoming Better Observers: How does observing, asking questions, and making connections help me understand things in nature?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This series of 5 high-quality, standards-aligned, inquiry-based activities have been field-tested by first grade students and families of Wequiock Children's Center for Environmental Science during Safer At Home orders. These activities encourage students to use natural areas around their homes and in their neigbhorhoods as they improve their science observation skils. The materials used are ones generally available at home and the activites require little preparation on the part of caregivers.Created as a part of a WISELearn OER Innovation project, Connect, Explore, and Engage: Using the Environment as the Context for Science Learning was a collaboration of the Wequiock Children's Center for Environmental Science and the Wisconsin Green Schools Network. One of the goals of the project was to create standards-aligned lessons that utilize the outdoor spaces of the school (as well as those of the students' homes).  Each section of this resource is an individual activity. While each activity builds on the previous ones, it is possible to use them individually.The observation protocol "I Notice, I Wonder, It Reminds Me Of, I Think Maybe" has been adapted from that of the BEETLES Project.The title image was used with permission and is courtesy of Joe Riederer.

Subject:
Earth and Space Science
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Life Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Sandy Benton
Karla Koch
Date Added:
05/28/2020
Becoming George Washington:
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

By studying young George Washington’s writings as a 16-year-old surveyor and writings from his first military trip five years later students will learn about his character and ambitions. The lesson will also help dispel some of the myths and misconceptions about Washington. Students will be introduced to a young man who is strong, brave and ready to make a name for himself.

Young George Washington Grades 4-6, has a 6 page lesson plan for the teachers and the following additional material: Additional Sources, Resource Pages 1-6, Images 1-5 and an answer key. The lesson uses Washington's own words, images and maps to show his character and ambitions and how he matures over time. The lesson highlights two of young Washington's adventures, his 1748 trip as a surveyor and his 1753 military trip to ask the French to leave the area.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
National Park Service
Date Added:
08/04/2022
Capture the Flag — KidCitizen
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

By investigating primary sources displaying the American flag, we will explore the various ways people use the flag to show characteristics such as pride, loyalty, and unity for the nation.

In this episode, students will engage in careful observation to identify flags and note details of the variety of places in which American flags are used (See).

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
KidCitizen
Date Added:
06/29/2022
Civics! An American Musical
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Do your students have what it takes to be the next hit Broadway musical producers? In this free civics learning game, students assume the role of a theater producer adapting true events from United States history to the stage. It’s up to them to analyze primary sources from the Library of Congress to create a new smash Broadway musical hit that is historically accurate and celebrates the power of ordinary citizens in creating change. Students work with different theatrical departments to learn about important aspects of creating a musical, such as costuming, set design, writing, and music. Once all the mini-games are complete, they are rewarded with a scene from their musical on opening night, completely personalized based on the creative choices they made during their game experience.

Subject:
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Game
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
FableVision Studios.
Date Added:
06/28/2022
Click Restraint Strategy
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson introduces click restraint, a strategy that helps students resist the urge to click on the first search result they receive in a search engine. Students learn to scan the results they receive to make an informed choice about which result to choose first.

Teacher materials, Student materials, and Presentation slides are included in this lesson.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Learning Task
Lesson
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
06/30/2022
Community Helpers
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

The importance of community helpers is a building block of civics understanding. In this episode, children investigate who community helpers are, and how they have changed over time through exploration of a rich photograph (from the Library of Congress) of a man delivering ice to a schoolhouse in 1899.

Children explore the photograph by revealing it in sections, observing the details they find (See), and working with in-game character Ella to figure out what jobs the helpers are doing. Children collect elements of the photograph to their journal, and use what they have collected to help them decide what the jobs are (Think), and then to connect those jobs with community helpers today (Wonder)

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Kidcitizen
Date Added:
06/10/2022
Comparing and Contrasting Inaugural Addresses
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Four Presidents called Illinois home – Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. Each presided over the country at a unique time in U.S. history, and this can be seen in the messages they communicated to the nation in their inaugural addresses. All four were reelected to a second term in office. Analysis of each president’s 1st and 2nd inaugural addresses provides an opportunity to compare and contrast the priorities, goals and intentions he outlined, as well as how the nation may have been changing at that time.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Abraham Lincoln Presidental Library and Museum
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Congress and Child Labor
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Congress is made up of a group of people who work together to improve the quality of lives of citizens throughout the nation. Long ago Congress decided that it was important to pass labor laws to protect children. Students will answer the question why child labor was a problem? They will explore this question by investigating a series of photographs of children working in fish factories long ago.
In addition,
In this episode, students will engage in careful observation to identify objects and note details (See), generate and test hypotheses based on evidence they have collected (Think), and reflect on their learning by applying it to related questions (Wonder).

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
KidCitizen
Date Added:
06/02/2022
Curriculum for Empowerment  (Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The National Park Service has created a K-12 curriculum that focuses on scaffolded lessons that focus on Martin Luther King’s advocacy, the March on Washington and other leaders of the Civil Rights movement.

Subject:
Character Education
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
The National Park Service
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Eric the Red and Leif Ericson Settlers Lesson Plan
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will explore the travels and discoveries of the Vikings. After viewing a short video about the Eric the Red and Leif Ericson, students will analyze a painting that depicts a Viking ship at sea and then read an Icelandic saga written about the early Norse people. The lesson will conclude with students researching the impact the Vikings had on the region of their choice and completing a report or presentation.

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Archaeology
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS. Learning Media
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Frances Willard House Curriculum Materials
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Thank you for choosing the Frances Willard House Museum Lesson Activities Packet for late elementary. Inside you will find six lesson activities. They can be done independently or as a series. Two activities that work well as a set are:
Two Wheels for Change:
Bicycle Technology and Changing America"
A Wheel Within a Wheel
Bicycles and Women's Suffrage.
Historical Markers - Writing About History Using Houses,

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Frances WIllard House Mueseum
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Grade 1, Unit 2 History Mystery 2:  WHAT MADE PEOPLE THINK GEORGE WASHINGTON WOULD BE A GOOD LEADER?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is the second part of the History's Mysteries unit, "What Makes a Good Leader?" In this lesson, students will study different situations that forced George Washington to learn leadership skills. By using George Washington as an example, students will learn that an important leadership skill is to ask for help. Using George Washington as an example, students will think of other leaders who displayed different types of leadership skills.
This lesson is part of a unit containing the following lessons:
Grade 1: Unit 2 History Mystery 1: WHAT MAKES SOMEONE A GOOD LEADER?
Grade 1: Unit 2 History Mystery 3: DO GOOD LEADERS ALWAYS DO GOOD THINGS?

Subject:
Education
Character Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
History's Mysteries
Date Added:
05/09/2022
Grade 1: Unit 2 History Mystery 3  Do Good Leaders Always Do Good Things?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is the third and final part of the History's Mysteries unit, "What Makes a Good Leader?" In this lesson, students explore that leaders often make complex decisions and don’t always display positive leadership traits. While learning about George Washington’s use of slave labor throughout his life, students realize that even leaders are rarely perfect and can make poor decisions. This difficult topic is displayed in through the use of images and pictures and discussed in vocabulary appropriate for young learners.
This lesson is part of a unit containing the following lessons:
Grade 1: Unit 2 History Mystery 1: WHAT MAKES SOMEONE A GOOD LEADER?
Grade 1: Unit 2 History Mystery 2: WHAT MADE PEOPLE THINK GEORGE WASHINGTON WOULD BE A GOOD LEADER?

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
History's Mysteries
Date Added:
05/12/2022
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 1  WHAT IS NATIVE SOVEREIGNTY AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will learn about some elements of Native sovereignty. They will learn what a Native nation is and why sovereignty is so important to a nation. The lesson focuses on why nations need land, why history is important, and how shared culture is also part of sovereignty. The lesson focuses on Native nations today because it is important to talk about Native nations today to break stereotypes that Native people only existed in the past.
This lesson is part of a Unit that includes the following lessons:
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 1: WHAT IS NATIVE SOVEREIGNTY AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 2: WHAT CAN DIFFERENT MAPS TELL US ABOUT NATIVE SOVEREIGNTY AND NATIVE LAND?
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 3: WHAT STRATEGIES TO NATIVE NATIONS USE TO PROTECT THEIR SOVEREIGNTY DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1)?
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 4: WHAT STRATEGIES TO NATIVE NATIONS USE TO PROTECT THEIR SOVEREIGNTY DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (2)?

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
American Indian Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
History's Mysteries
Date Added:
06/01/2022
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 2 : What Can Different Maps Tell  Us About  Native Sovereigmty and Native Land?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students will look at 3 maps to learn about where the ancestral tribal lands of four Native nations are located. The four nations are the Iroquois Confederacy (made of 5 nations), the Cherokee Nation, the Chickasaw Nation, and the Western Abenaki nation. Students will label all four groups on three different maps and as they look at each map they will consider how the land is represented on the map and how that might impact how people understand Native land and Native sovereignty.
This lesson is part of a Unit that includes the following lessons:
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 1: WHAT IS NATIVE SOVEREIGNTY AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 2: WHAT CAN DIFFERENT MAPS TELL US ABOUT NATIVE SOVEREIGNTY AND NATIVE LAND?
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 3: WHAT STRATEGIES TO NATIVE NATIONS USE TO PROTECT THEIR SOVEREIGNTY DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1)?
Grade 3 Unit 2 History Mystery 4: WHAT STRATEGIES TO NATIVE NATIONS USE TO PROTECT THEIR SOVEREIGNTY DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (2)?

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Social Studies
American Indian Studies
Civics and Government
Geography
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
History's Mysteries
Date Added:
06/01/2022