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Recording March 16, 2022 Feedback and Assessment: What Evidence of Learning Can Be Found in Students' Nature Journal Entries?
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Do you use nature journaling in your instruction? What evidence do students' journal entries provide on what they have learned and where they need to go next in their learning journeys?

In this session, we will: connect with experts and resources on nature journaling; explore practices to give students agency in their learning through self-assessment and peer feedback; and offer ways to improve deliberate practice to grow ideas and approaches.

New resources for nature journaling as well as the How to Teach Nature Journaling book.

Subject:
Earth and Space Science
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Life Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Sandy Benton
Date Added:
04/11/2022
Resources from Chats: Nature Journaling
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This is a collaborative document of resources recommended by members of the Using BEETLES and Nature Journaling for High Quality Science Instruction. It is compilation of the ongoing chats of the Zoom meetings of the group.

Updates and revisions will occur throughout the collaboration by members of the group.

Subject:
Earth and Space Science
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Life Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Sandy Benton
Date Added:
04/11/2022
SIFTR
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Siftr is a fieldwork tool that helps extend learning beyond the classroom walls - preparing people of all ages to learn in the wild. Siftr has been used in a variety of contexts to help students make connections between what they are studying in the classroom and the real world.
Vist www.siftr.org to learn more about the platform, see how others are using it, and create you own Siftr-based activity.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Interactive
Other
Provider:
Field Day
Date Added:
02/17/2016
What Makes a Forest?
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NUTSHELL: In the optional Field Enhancement portion of the lesson, the class explores the living and nonliving parts of a forest while on a hike. Students spend individual quiet time observing and drawing parts of a forest. In main portion of the lesson, students match plant species with forest ecosystems and learn that living things are influenced by the nonliving things around them. They create a song or skit to show what they have learned about living and nonliving connections. The students conclude the lesson by creating a mural of different types of Wisconsin forests.
BIG IDEAS
Forests are ecosystems characterized by a dominance of tree cover and they contain a variety of other organisms (e.g., other plants, animals).Forests differ in composition (species within a forest) and structure (layers in a forest). These are both affected by biotic (e.g., animals, plants, humans) and abiotic (e.g., soil moisture, sunlight, climate) factors. 
OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:
Explain how living things in a forest depend on nonliving things.Recognize that all forests do not contain the same plants and animals.
SUBJECT AREAS: Arts, Language Arts, Science
LESSON/ACTIVITY TIME
Total Lesson Time: 190 minutes (including optional Field Enhancement)Time Breakdown: Field Enhancement (optional)--50 minutes; Introduction--15 minutes; Activity 1--35 minutes; Activity 2--45 minutes; Conclusion--45 minutes
TEACHING SITE Classroom; well-forested site for optional Field Enhancement

Subject:
Biology
Environmental Science
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
LEAF, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources-Division of Forestry, and the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Whose Science? Climate Perspectives
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This powerpoint presentation was provided by Cathy Techtmann, a Professor of Community Resource Development and an Environmental Outreach Specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Division of Extension to gain an understanding of public perspectives on climate issues. Cathy lives and works in the homeland of the Lake Superior Ojibwe people. This presentation was part of the 2023 Fall Climate Education Series. Portions of this presentation could be used to introduce learners to place-based climate impacts. 

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Earth and Space Science
Environmental Literacy and Sustainability
Environmental Science
Forestry and Agriculture
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Author:
Victoria Rydberg-Nania
Date Added:
10/09/2023
Wood's Worth
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NUTSHELL In this highly interactive lesson, students explore the tools used by foresters to measure tree diameter and height, then calculate the number of board feet in a tree and the number of products that can be made from that tree. Afterwards, students go on a scavenger hunt to explore many ways that forests are valuable.
OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:
Determine the number of board feet in a tree.Identify social, economic, and environmental values of trees.
SUBJECT AREAS Mathematics, Science, Social Studies
LESSON/ACTIVITY TIME
Total Lesson Time: 150 minutes (not including optional add-on lesson)Time Breakdown: Pre-activity--60 minutes; Introduction--10 minutes; Activity 1--40 minutes; Activity 2--30 minutes; Conclusion--10 minutes (Optional classroom lesson "We All Need Trees--90 minutes)
TEACHING SITE: A wooded area with trees at least 10 inches in diameter. Ideal species include maple, oak, aspen, birch, and pine.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Life Science
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
LEAF, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources - Division of Forestry, and Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education
Date Added:
01/01/2004