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ACP Less
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Students will use engineering skills to develop and use models as well as collaboratively plan an investigation to make sense of buoyancy.

Remix this template to upload your ACP lesson and unit plans into WISELearn.

Subject:
Oceanography
Education
Character Education
Environmental Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Learning Task
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Other
Author:
Blake Jersey
Date Added:
01/16/2020
Above-Ground Storage Tank Design Project
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At this point in the unit, students have learned about Pascal's law, Archimedes' principle, Bernoulli's principle, and why above-ground storage tanks are of major concern in the Houston Ship Channel and other coastal areas. In this culminating activity, student groups act as engineering design teams to derive equations to determine the stability of specific above-ground storage tank scenarios with given tank specifications and liquid contents. With their floatation analyses completed and the stability determined, students analyze the tank stability in specific storm conditions. Then, teams are challenged to come up with improved storage tank designs to make them less vulnerable to uplift, displacement and buckling in storm conditions. Teams present their analyses and design ideas in short class presentations.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Emily Sappington, Mila Taylor
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Above-Ground Storage Tanks in the Houston Ship Channel
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Students are provided with an introduction to above-ground storage tanks, specifically how and why they are used in the Houston Ship Channel. The introduction includes many photographic examples of petrochemical tank failures during major storms and describes the consequences in environmental pollution and costs to disrupted businesses and lives, as well as the lack of safety codes and provisions to better secure the tanks in coastal regions regularly visited by hurricanes. Students learn how the concepts of Archimedes' principle and Pascal's law act out in the form of the uplifting and buckling seen in the damaged and destroyed tanks, which sets the stage for the real-world engineering challenge presented in the associated activity to design new and/or improved storage tanks that can survive storm conditions.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Art and Design
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Emily Sappington, Mila Taylor
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Accelerometer: Centripetal Acceleration
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Students work as physicists to understand centripetal acceleration concepts. They also learn about a good robot design and the accelerometer sensor. They also learn about the relationship between centripetal acceleration and centripetal force governed by the radius between the motor and accelerometer and the amount of mass at the end of the robot's arm. Students graph and analyze data collected from an accelerometer, and learn to design robots with proper weight distribution across the robot for their robotic arms. Upon using a data logging program, they view their own data collected during the activity. By activity end , students understand how a change in radius or mass can affect the data obtained from the accelerometer through the plots generated from the data logging program. More specifically, students learn about the accuracy and precision of the accelerometer measurements from numerous trials.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
AMPS GK-12 Program,
Carlo Yuvienco
Jennifer S. Haghpanah
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Action-Reaction! Rocket
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Students construct rockets from balloons propelled along a guide string. They use this model to learn about Newton's three laws of motion, examining the effect of different forces on the motion of the rocket.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Ben Heavner
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sabre Duren
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Archimedes' Principle, Pascal's Law and Bernoulli's Principle
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Students are introduced to Pascal's law, Archimedes' principle and Bernoulli's principle. Fundamental definitions, equations, practice problems and engineering applications are supplied. A PowerPoint® presentation, practice problems and grading rubric are provided.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Emily Sappington
Mila Taylor
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Architectural Design, Level II: Material and Tectonic Transformations: The Herreshoff Museum, Fall 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This semester students are asked to transform the Hereshoff Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island, through processes of erasure and addition. Hereshoff Manufacturing was recognized as one of the premier builders of America's Cup racing boats between 1890's and 1930's. The studio however, is about more then the program. It is about land, water, and wind and the search for expressing materially and tectonically the relationships between these principle conditions. That is, where the land is primarily about stasis (docking, anchoring and referencing our locus), water's fluidity holds the latent promise of movement and freedom. Movement is activated by wind, allowing for negotiating the relationship between water and land.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Fine Arts
Art and Design
Performing and Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lukez, Paul
Date Added:
01/01/2003
The Art of Approximation in Science and Engineering: How to Whip Out Answers Quickly
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The purpose of this learning video is to show students how to think more freely about math and science problems. Sometimes getting an approximate answer in a much shorter period of time is well worth the time saved. This video explores techniques for making quick, back-of-the-envelope approximations that are not only surprisingly accurate, but are also illuminating for building intuition in understanding science. This video touches upon 10th-grade level Algebra I and first-year high school physics, but the concepts covered (velocity, distance, mass, etc) are basic enough that science-oriented younger students would understand. If desired, teachers may bring in pendula of various lengths, weights to hang, and a stopwatch to measure period. Examples of in- class exercises for between the video segments include: asking students to estimate 29 x 31 without a calculator or paper and pencil; and asking students how close they can get to a black hole without getting sucked in.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Algebra
Numbers and Operations
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT Learning International Networks Consortium
Provider Set:
M.I.T. Blossoms
Author:
Stephen M. Hou
Date Added:
10/10/2017
Attack of the Raging River
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In this lesson, the students will discover the relationship between an object's mass and the amount of space it takes up (its volume). The students will also learn about the concepts of displacement and density.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Adventure Engineering,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Balancing Act
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Play with objects on a teeter totter to learn about balance. Test what you've learned by trying the Balance Challenge game.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Ariel Paul
John Blanco
Kathy Perkins
Michael Dubson
PhET Interactive Simulations
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
04/24/2012
Bombs Away!
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Educational Use
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Students design and build devices to protect and accurately deliver dropped eggs. The devices and their contents represent care packages that must be safely delivered to people in a disaster area with no road access. Similar to engineering design teams, students design their devices using a number of requirements and constraints such as limited supplies and time. The activity emphasizes the change from potential energy to kinetic energy of the devices and their contents and the energy transfer that occurs on impact. Students enjoy this competitive challenge as they attain a deeper understanding of mechanical energy concepts.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Dan Choi, MUSIC Program
Engineering K-PhD Program,
Randall Evans, MUSIC Program
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Bones! Bones! Bones!
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After learning, comparing and contrasting the steps of the engineering design process (EDP) and scientific method, students review the human skeletal system, including the major bones, bone types, bone functions and bone tissues, as well as other details about bone composition. Students then pair-read an article about bones and bone growth and compile their notes to summarize the article. Finally, students complete a homework assignment to review the major bones in the human body, preparing them for the associated activities in which they create and test prototype replacement bones with appropriate densities. Two PowerPoint(TM) presentations, pre-/post-test, handout and worksheet are provided.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Inquiry-Based Bioengineering Research and Design Experiences for Middle-School Teachers RET Program, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute,
Michelle Gallagher, Terri Camesano, Jeanne Hubelbank, Kristen Billiar, Dua Chaker, Carleigh Samson
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Buoyancy
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CC BY
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When will objects float and when will they sink? Learn how buoyancy works with blocks. Arrows show the applied forces, and you can modify the properties of the blocks and the fluid.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Adams, Wendy
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Jonathan Olson
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Lancaster, Kelly
Loeblein, Trish
Malley, Chris
Noah Podolefsky
Olson, Jonathan
Paulson, Archie
Perkins, Kathy
PhET Interactive Simulations
Podolefsky, Noah
Reid, Sam
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Wendy Adams
Wieman, Carl
Date Added:
09/30/2010
Buoyancy (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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When will objects float and when will they sink? Learn how buoyancy works with blocks. Arrows show the applied forces, and you can modify the properties of the blocks and the fluid.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Adams, Wendy
Lancaster, Kelly
Loeblein, Trish
Malley, Chris
Olson, Jonathan
Paulson, Archie
Perkins, Kathy
Podolefsky, Noah
Reid, Sam
Wieman, Carl
Date Added:
10/01/2010
Remix
Buoyant Bill
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Students will use engineering skills to develop and use models as well as collaboratively plan an investigation to make sense of buoyancy.

Subject:
Oceanography
Education
Character Education
Environmental Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Learning Task
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Other
Author:
Blake Jersey
Lynn Aprill
Date Added:
01/16/2020
Can It Support You? No Bones about It!
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Educational Use
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After completing the associated lesson and its first associated activity, students are familiar with the 20 major bones in the human body knowing their locations and relative densities. When those bones break, lose their densities or are destroyed, we look to biomedical engineers to provide replacements. In this activity, student pairs are challenged to choose materials and create prototypes that could replace specific bones. They follow the steps of the engineering design process, researching, brainstorming, prototyping and testing to find bone replacement solutions. Specifically, they focus on identifying substances that when combined into a creative design might provide the same density (and thus strength and support) as their natural counterparts. After iterations to improve their designs, they present their bone alternative solutions to the rest of the class. They refer to the measured and calculated densities for fabricated human bones calculated in the previous activity, and conduct Internet research to learn the densities of given fabrication materials (or measure/calculate those densities if not found online).

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Inquiry-Based Bioengineering Research and Design Experiences for Middle-School Teachers RET Program, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute,
Michelle Gallagher, Terri Camesano, Jeanne Hubelbank, Kristen Billiar
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Cartesian Diver
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Students observe Pascal's law, Archimedes' principle and the ideal gas law as a Cartesian diver moves within a closed system. The Cartesian diver is neutrally buoyant and begins to sink when an external pressure is applied to the closed system. A basic explanation and proof of this process is provided in this activity, and supplementary ideas for more extensive demonstrations and independent group activities are presented.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Emily Sappington, Mila Taylor
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Catapults!
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Students observe the relationship between the angle of a catapult (a force measurement) and the flight of a cotton ball. They learn how Newton's second law of motion works by seeing directly that F = ma. When they pull the metal "arm" back further, thus applying a greater force to the cotton ball, it causes the cotton ball to travel faster and farther. Students also learn that objects of greater mass require more force to result in the same distance traveled by a lighter object.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Ben Heavner
Denise Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sabre Duren
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Colliding Pennies
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0.0 stars

This lesson uses a combination of inquiry experiment, direct instruction, and a video to help students understand how energy works and how it can be applied to pennies.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Better Lesson
Date Added:
03/20/2018
Crash! Bang!
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Educational Use
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Students learn about the physical force of linear momentum movement in a straight line by investigating collisions. They learn an equation that engineers use to describe momentum. Students also investigate the psychological phenomenon of momentum; they see how the "big mo" of the bandwagon effect contributes to the development of fads and manias, and how modern technology and mass media accelerate and intensify the effect.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Ben Heavner
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Why do objects like wood float in water? Does it depend on size? Create a custom object to explore the effects of mass and volume on density. Can you discover the relationship? Use the scale to measure the mass of an object, then hold the object under water to measure its volume. Can you identify all the mystery objects?

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Archie Paulson
Carl Wieman
Chris Malley
Jonathan Olson
Kathy Perkins
Kelly Lancaster
Noah Podolefsky
PhET Interactive Simulations
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Density (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Why do objects like wood float in water? Does it depend on size? Create a custom object to explore the effects of mass and volume on density. Can you discover the relationship? Use the scale to measure the mass of an object, then hold the object under water to measure its volume. Can you identify all the mystery objects?

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Adams, Wendy
Lancaster, Kelly
Loeblein, Patricia
Malley, Chris
Olson, Jonathan
Paulson, Archie
Perkins, Kathy
Podolefsky, Noah
Reid, Sam
Wieman, Carl
Date Added:
09/01/2010
Density Column Lab - Part 1
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In this first part of a two-part lab activity, students use triple balance beams and graduated cylinders to take measurements and calculate the densities of several common, irregularly shaped objects with the purpose to resolve confusion about mass and density. After this activity, conduct the associated Density Column Lab - Part 2 activity before presenting the associated Density & Miscibility lesson for discussion about concepts that explain what students have observed.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
GK-12 Program,
Jessica Ray, Phyllis Balcerzak, Barry Williams
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density Column Lab - Part 2
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Educational Use
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Concluding a two-part lab activity, students use triple balance beams and graduated cylinders to take measurements and calculate densities of several household liquids and compare them to the densities of irregularly shaped objects (as determined in Part 1). Then they create density columns with the three liquids and four solid items to test their calculations and predictions of the different densities. Once their density columns are complete, students determine the effect of adding detergent to the columns. After this activity, present the associated Density & Miscibility lesson for a discussion about why the column layers do not mix.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Life Science
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
GK-12 Program,
Jessica Ray, Phyllis Balcerzak, Barry Williams
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Density Lab using Tootsie Rolls and Playdough
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CC BY-NC
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Middle School Students love these two things together--squeezing things that are squishy, and eating candy!This is a lab using Playdough and Tootsie Rolls, in which students will measure the volume, mass, and the density of both substances.  Students should gain a deeper meaning of what the physical property of density is after completing this lab.  They should be able to explain WHY one substance is more dense or less dense than another.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Nancy Marita
Date Added:
12/12/2018
Does Your Chewing Gum Lose Its Sweetness?
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In the first part of the activity, each student chews a piece of gum until it loses its sweetness, and then leaves the gum to dry for several days before weighing it to determine the amount of mass lost. This mass corresponds to the amount of sugar in the gum, and can be compared to the amount stated on the package label. In the second part of the activity, students work in groups to design and conduct new experiments based on questions of their own choosing. These questions arise naturally from observations during the first experiment, and from students' own experiences with and knowledge of the many varieties of chewing and bubble gums available.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Nutrition Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,
Mary R. Hebrank (project writer and consultant)
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Don't Crack Humpty
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Student groups are provided with a generic car base on which to design a device/enclosure to protect an egg on or in the car as it rolls down a ramp at increasing slopes. During this in-depth physics/science/technology activity, student teams design, build and test their creations to meet the design challenge, and are expected to perform basic mathematical calculations using collected data, including a summative cost to benefit ratio.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Justin Riley
K-12 Outreach Office,
Ryan St. Gelais
Scott Beaurivage
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Downhill Race
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Through this activity, students will be able to explore the role of mass distribution as cylinders roll down an incline.
Students will roll two cylinders filled with the same mass, but distributed differentlly. Students will predict which one reaches the bottom faster.
Using easily accessible materials, this activity can be conducted in the classroom.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Learning Task
Simulation
Provider:
Exploratorium Teacher Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2016
Energy Skate Park: Basics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will: Predict the kinetic and potential energy of objects Design a skate park Examine how kinetic and potential energy interact with each other

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Ariel Paul
Emily B Moore
Katherine Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Noah Podolefsky & Ariel Paul
PhET Interactive Simulations
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
01/31/2012
Engineering Mechanics II, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This subject provides an introduction to fluid mechanics. Students are introduced to and become familiar with all relevant physical properties and fundamental laws governing the behavior of fluids and learn how to solve a variety of problems of interest to civil and environmental engineers. While there is a chance to put skills from Calculus and Differential Equations to use in this subject, the emphasis is on physical understanding of why a fluid behaves the way it does. The aim is to make the students think as a fluid. In addition to relating a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, the subject prepares students for higher-level subjects in fluid dynamics.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Calculus
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Madsen, Ole
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Estimating Buoyancy
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Educational Use
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Students learn that buoyancy is responsible for making boats, hot air balloons and weather balloons float. They calculate whether or not a boat or balloon will float, and calculate the volume needed to make a balloon or boat of a certain mass float. Conduct the first day of the associated activity before conducting this lesson.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Marissa H. Forbes
Mike Soltys
TeachEngineering.org
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media, Spring 2001
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. To this end, we'll think about writing as an act of self-discovery, as an act of critical thinking, and as an act of communicating with an audience. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subject:
Fine Arts
Media Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Walsh, Andrea S.
Date Added:
01/01/2001
Flying with Style
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

During the associated lesson, students have learned about Newton's three laws of motion and free-body diagrams and have identified the forces of thrust, drag and gravity. As students begin to understand the physics behind thrust, drag and gravity and how these relate these to Newton's three laws of motion, groups assemble and launch the rockets that they designed in the associated lesson. The height of the rockets, after constructed and launched, are measured and compared to the theoretical values calculated during the rocket lesson. Effective teamwork and attention to detail is key for successful launches.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Brian Rohde
Don McGowan
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Forces and Graphing
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Use this activity to explore forces acting on objects, practice graphing experimental data, and introduce the algebra concepts of slope and intercept of a line. A wooden 2 x 4 beam is set on top of two scales. Students learn how to conduct an experiment by applying loads at different locations along the beam, recording the exact position of the applied load and the reaction forces measured by the scales at each end of the beam. In addition, students analyze the experiment data with the use of a chart and a table, and model/graph linear equations to describe relationships between independent and dependent variables.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
GK-12 Program, Center for Engineering and Computing Education, College of Engineering and Information Technology,
Ivanka Todorova
Jed Lyons
John Brader
TeachEngineering.org
Veronica Addison
Date Added:
09/18/2014
General Chemistry I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This survey chemistry course is designed to introduce students to the world of chemistry. In this course, we will study chemistry from the ground up, learning the basics of the atom and its behavior. We will apply this knowledge to understand the chemical properties of matter and the changes and reactions that take place in all types of matter. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the general term 'chemistry.' Distinguish between the physical and chemical properties of matter. Distinguish between mixtures and pure substances. Describe the arrangement of the periodic table. Perform mathematical operations involving significant figures. Convert measurements into scientific notation. Explain the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition, and the law of multiple proportions. Summarize the essential points of Dalton's atomic theory. Define the term 'atom.' Describe electron configurations. Draw Lewis structures for molecules. Name ionic and covalent compounds using the rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Explain the relationship between enthalpy change and a reaction's tendency to occur. (Chemistry 101; See also: Biology 105. Mechanical Engineering 004)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/09/2017
Gravity Force Lab
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Visualize the gravitational force that two objects exert on each other. Change properties of the objects in order to see how it changes the gravity force.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Loeblein, Trish
Noah Podolefsky
PhET Interactive Simulations
Podolefsky, Noah
Reid, Sam
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Wieman, Carl
Date Added:
11/12/2010
Gravity Force Lab (AR)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Visualize the gravitational force that two objects exert on each other. Change properties of the objects in order to see how it changes the gravity force.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Loeblein, Trish
Podolefsky, Noah
Reid, Sam
Wieman, Carl
Date Added:
02/02/2013
Hanging Around
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Educational Use
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0.0 stars

Students learn about weight by building a spring scale and observing how it responds to objects with different masses.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Ben Heavner
Denise Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
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Students apply their mathematics and team building skills to explore the concept of rocketry. They learn about design issues faced by aerospace engineers when trying to launch rocketships or satellites in order to land them safely in the ocean, for example. Students learn the value of designing within constraints while brainstorming a rocketry system using provided materials and a specified project budget. Throughout the design process, teamwork is emphasized since the most successful launches occur when groups work effectively to generate creative ideas and solutions to the rocket challenge.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Brian Rohde
Don McGowan
National Science Foundation GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers (RET) Programs,
Date Added:
09/18/2014