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  • Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Are Dams Forever?
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students learn that dams do not last forever. Similar to other human-made structures, such as roads and bridges, dams require regular maintenance and have a finite lifespan. Many dams built during the 1930-70s, an era of intensive dam construction, have an expected life of 50-100 years. Due to inadequate maintenance and/or for environmental reasons, some of these dams will fail or be removed in the next 50 years. The engineers with Splash Engineering have an ethical obligation to remind Thirsty County of the maintenance and lifespan concerns associated with its dam.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Jeff Lyng
Kristin Field
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Beat Goes On
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Educational Use
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In this activity, students learn about their heart rate and different ways it can be measured. Students construct a simple measurement device using clay and a toothpick, and then use this device to measure their heart rate under different circumstances (i.e., sitting, standing and jumping). Students make predictions and record data on a worksheet.

Subject:
Health Science
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Bernoulli's Principle
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Educational Use
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Bernoulli's principle relates the pressure of a fluid to its elevation and its speed. Bernoulli's equation can be used to approximate these parameters in water, air or any fluid that has very low viscosity. Students learn about the relationships between the components of the Bernoulli equation through real-life engineering examples and practice problems.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
James Prager
Karen King
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Bumps and Bruises
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Educational Use
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Athletes often wear protective gear to keep themselves safe in contact sports. In this spirit, students follow the steps of engineering design process as they design, build and test protective padding for an egg drop. Many of the design considerations surrounding egg drops are similar to sports equipment design. Watching the transformation of energy from potential to kinetic, observing the impact and working under material constraints introduces students to "sports engineering" and gives them a chance to experience some of the challenges engineers face in designing equipment to protect athletes.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Art and Design
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Abigail Watrous
Connor Lowrey
Denali Lander
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Katherine Beggs
Melissa Straten
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Dam Forces
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Educational Use
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Students learn how the force of water helps determine the size and shape of dams. They use clay to build models of four types of dams, and observe the force of the water against each type. They conclude by deciding which type of dam they, as Splash Engineering engineers, will design for Thirsty County.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Kristin Field
Lauren Cooper
Megan Podlogar
Sara Born
Timothy M. Dittrich
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Designing Bridges
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Educational Use
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Students learn about the types of possible loads, how to calculate ultimate load combinations, and investigate the different sizes for the beams (girders) and columns (piers) of simple bridge design. Students learn the steps that engineers use to design bridges: understanding the problem, determining the potential bridge loads, calculating the highest possible load, and calculating the amount of material needed to resist the loads.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Art and Design
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Christopher Valenti
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Joe Friedrichsen
Jonathan S. Goode
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Do You Have the Strength?
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Educational Use
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In this activity, students squeeze a tennis ball to demonstrate the strength of the human heart. Working in teams, they think of ways to keep the heart beating if the natural mechanism were to fail. The goal of this activity is to get students to understand the strength and resilience of the heart.

Subject:
Health Science
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Julie Marquez
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Edible Rovers – High School
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students act as Mars exploratory rover engineers, designing, building and displaying their edible rovers to a design review. To begin, they evaluate rover equipment and material options to determine which parts might fit in their given NASA budget. With provided parts and material lists, teams analyze their design options and use their findings to design their rovers.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Ben Sprague
Chris Yakacki
Daria Kotys-Schwartz
Denise W. Carlson
Geoffrey Hill
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
The Magician's Catapult
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Educational Use
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In this activity, students reinforce their understanding of compound machines by building a catapult. This compound machine consists of a lever and a wheel-and-axel. Catapults have been designed by engineers for a variety of purposes from lifting boulders into the air for warfare to human beings for entertainment; the projectiles in this activity are grapes for a magic act. Given the building materials, students design and build their catapult to launch a grape a certain distance.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Michael J. Bendewald
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Park It!
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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The difference between an architect and an engineer is sometimes confusing because their roles in building design can be similar. Students experience a bit of both professions by following a set of requirements and meeting given constraints as they create a model parking garage. They experience the engineering design process first-hand as they design, build and test their models. They draw a blueprint for their design, select the construction materials and budget their expenditures. They also test their structures for strength and find their maximum loads.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Art and Design
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Abigail Watrous
Denali Lander
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Katherine Beggs
Melissa Straten
Sara Stemler
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Shapes of Strength
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students are introduced to brainstorming and the design process in problem solving as it relates to engineering. They perform an activity to develop and understand problem solving with an emphasis on learning from history. Using only paper, straws, tape and paper clips, they create structures that can support the weight of at least one textbook. In their first attempts to build the structures, they build whatever comes to mind. For the second trial, they examine examples of successful buildings from history and try again.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Abigail Watrous
Denali Lander
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Katherine Beggs
Melissa Straten
Tod Sullivan
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Sound Line
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Educational Use
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Students learn the decibel reading of various noises and why high-level readings damage hearing. Sound types and decibel readings are written on sheets of paper, and students arrange the sounds from the lowest to highest decibel levels. If available, a decibel meter can be used to measure sounds by students.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Emily Weller
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sara Born
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Swinging Pendulum (for High School)
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This activity shows students the engineering importance of understanding the laws of mechanical energy. More specifically, it demonstrates how potential energy can be converted to kinetic energy and back again. Given a pendulum height, students calculate and predict how fast the pendulum will swing by using the equations for potential and kinetic energy. The equations will be justified as students experimentally measure the speed of the pendulum and compare theory with reality.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Your River's Health
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students perform a macroinvertebrate survey to gauge the health of a local river. They collect water samples and count macroinvertebrates to learn how the health of a river's ecosystem can be determined by its river insect population.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering NGSS Aligned Resources
Author:
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Laboratory,
Kristin Field
Megan Podlogar
Sara Born
Date Added:
09/18/2014