Author:
MBA Research and Curriculum Center
Subject:
Career and Technical Education, Business and Information Technology, Marketing, Management and Entrepreneurship, Economics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
  • Economics
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Global Business
  • International Business
  • Project
  • Project Based Learning
  • Project Management
  • Project Management Tools
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    To Have & To Hold - Project with Rubric

    Overview

    Project Description:

     

    This project introduces students to entrepreneurship as well as economic systems, developing nations, and transitional economies. Each team will conduct thorough research on the economies of three diverse nations and determine which of those countries is most hospitable and supportive of entrepreneurship and private business ownership. After identifying which of the three is most ideal for entrepreneurship, the team will create promotional pieces of its choice (e.g., television commercial, series of advertisements, podcast, etc.) to persuade would-be entrepreneurs to start their businesses in that particular country.

    The attached project document (found in the Resource Library) includes step-by-step instructions, templates, briefings, resources, and rubrics to help guide the project.

     

    Driving Question:

     

    Which countries are most supportive of entrepreneurship and personal business ownership?

     

    Timeframe:

     

    2 weeks

    Entry Event

    Give each student a small post-it note and ask him/her to think of an object that starts with the same letter as their last name (e.g., F = fence, H = hat, etc.). Students should write that word on the post-it note and stick the note on their forehead. Instruct students to walk around the room and combine their word with someone else’s to create something new. Examples might include rock + chair = a spongy mat to put on top of rocks to transform into a chair, or deck + Legos = a put-it-together adjustable wooden deck that can be dismantled and stored. If any students are stumped, assist them in coming up with new product ideas. Have each pair explain to the class the new product that it made and award a prize (e.g., sticker, candy, etc.) to the team with the most innovative idea. Repeat this process as many times as desired.

     

    NOTE: The post-it note icebreaker activity comes from the article Brainstorming Sessions Icebreakers by Michael Michalko, found at http://www.creativitypost.com/create/brainstorming_sessions_icebreakers

    Your instructor will give you a small post-it note. Think of an object that starts with the same letter as your last name (e.g., F = fence, H = hat, etc.). Write that word on the post-it note and stick the note on your forehead. Walk around the room and combine your word with someone else’s to create something new. Examples might include rock + chair = a spongy mat to put on top of rocks to transform into a chair, or deck + Legos = a put-it-together adjustable wooden deck that can be dismantled and stored. Then, explain to the class the new product that you and your partner made.

    After completing this activity, lead a class discussion about the connection between entrepreneurship and what they just did (i.e., entrepreneurship often involves the development of new products and ideas). Then ask students to consider what support they received during the exercise (e.g., directions, supplies, space to move around, assistance from the teacher and other classmates, rewards, etc.) and how the activity might have turned out differently without this support. Explain to the class that just as you provided support to students during the activity, some governments provide assistance to entrepreneurs interested in starting new businesses, while other governments may not even approve of private business ownership. Finally, explain that the government’s view of entrepreneurship typically depends on the country’s economic system.

    Participate a class discussion about the connection between entrepreneurship and what you just did. Then, consider what support you received during the exercise (e.g., directions, supplies, space to move around, assistance from the teacher and other classmates, rewards, etc.) and how the activity might have turned out differently without this support.

    Select Countries to Research

    Students should work in teams of three for this project. Each team of students should select one country from each of the following three columns to research.

    Work in a team of three. Select one country from each of the following three columns to research:

    A

    B

    C

    Bolivia

    China

    Cuba

    Laos

    North Korea      

    Vietnam

    Australia

    Canada

    Finland

    Germany

    Japan

    South Africa 

    Albania

    Armenia

    Chad

    Guatemala

     India

    Sri Lanka

     

    Develop Project Charter

    Each team should use the template provided to describe the project; develop a milestone schedule; and determine the team’s operating principles.

    Use the template provided to describe the project; develop a milestone schedule; and determine the team’s operating principles.

    Define Project Scope

    Each team should define the scope of both the project and project products. Students should also clearly identify what will be included vs. what will be excluded from the project and products.

    Define the scope of both the project and project products. Clearly identify what will be included vs. what will be excluded from the project and products.

    Develop Work Breakdown Structure

    Each team should create a work breakdown structure (WBS). The WBS is a detailed listing of all of the things that must be delivered and all of the activities that must be carried out to complete the project. The WBS breaks the project deliverables into smaller and smaller chunks of work, called work packages. After identifying all of its work packages, each team should put its work packages in a logical order for completing the project

    Create a work breakdown structure (WBS). The WBS is a detailed listing of all of the things that must be delivered and all of the activities that must be carried out to complete the project. The WBS breaks the project deliverables into smaller and smaller chunks of work, called work packages. After identifying all of the work packages, put your work packages in a logical order for completing the project. Turn in your WBS to your instructor for review.

    Develop Schedule

    Students should estimate the amount of time required for each work package. Then, they should assign dates to the work packages based on due dates and estimated time required.

    Estimate the amount of time required for each work package. Then, assign dates to the work packages based on due dates and estimated time required. Turn in your project schedule to your instructor.

    Determine Responsibilities

    Each team should consider team members’ strengths and abilities and then determine who will be responsible for completing each work package.

    Consider team members’ strengths and abilities and then determine who will be responsible for completing each work package.

    Conduct Research

    Team members should determine who will become the expert on each of the team’s three selected countries (one team member per country). Each student should then conduct extensive research on his/her chosen country. This research should focus on the country’s economy and its likelihood to embrace and support entrepreneurs and small business owners. Questions for students to answer as they do their research can be found below.

    Determine who will become the expert on each of the team’s three selected countries (one team member per country). Then, conduct extensive research on your chosen country. This research should focus on the country’s economy and its likelihood to embrace and support entrepreneurs and small business owners. Questions to answer as they do their research can be found below:

    1.      What economic system does the country have?

    2.      Does the country have a developing, transitional, and/or developed economy?

    3.      Who is allowed to own a business there?

    4.      What forms of business ownership are permitted in the country?

    5.      What are the processes for starting a business there?

    6.      How much of the profit does an entrepreneur get to keep?

    7.      What types of goods and services are entrepreneurs allowed to offer?

    8.      Who gets the goods/services that entrepreneurs offer?

    9.      What competition do entrepreneurs face there?

    10.    What are the risks of starting a business there?

    11.    What support is available to entrepreneurs in the country? (Examples include aid from international organizations, federal government assistance, etc.)

    Analyze Research Data

    Upon completion of their individual research, team members should share their findings with each other. As a team, they should identify similarities and differences among the three countries’ economies. Finally, they should determine which of the team’s chosen countries is most likely to support entrepreneurship and personal business ownership.  

    Share your findings with your team members. As a team,  identify similarities and differences among the three countries’ economies. Finally, determine which of the team’s chosen countries is most likely to support entrepreneurship and personal business ownership.  

    Create Promotional Materials

    At this point, each team should develop one or more promotional materials of its choice (e.g., television commercial, series of advertisements, podcast, etc.) to promote the country that it determined to be most supportive of entrepreneurship and personal business ownership. These materials, which should be targeted at entrepreneurs looking to start a business in a foreign country, should emphasize the advantages of starting and owning a business in that nation. Evaluate the promotional materials using the rubric provided.

    Develop one or more promotional materials of your team's choice (e.g., television commercial, series of advertisements, podcast, etc.) to promote the country that you determined to be most supportive of entrepreneurship and personal business ownership. These materials, which should be targeted at entrepreneurs looking to start a business in a foreign country, should emphasize the advantages of starting and owning a business in that nation. Use the attached rubric to guide you.

    Complete Status Reports

    Each team should use the template provided to complete and submit a project status report to the instructor on two predetermined dates of the instructor’s choice

    Use the template provided to complete and submit a project status report to the instructor on two predetermined dates of the instructor’s choice

    Present Promotional Tools

    Each team should present and explain its promotional tools to a local entrepreneur/small business owner, economic development office representative, etc. After reviewing the teams’ work, that individual should determine which team’s promotions were most persuasive—and therefore, in which country s/he would be most likely to start a new business.

    Present and explain your promotional tools to a local entrepreneur/small business owner, economic development office representative, etc. That individual will determine which team’s promotions were most persuasive—and therefore, in which country s/he would be most likely to start a new business. 

    Conduct Post-Project Review

    Each team member should complete the post-project review form. Then, working as a team, they should compile and analyze their responses.

    Complete the post-project review form. Then, working as a team, compile and analyze your responses.