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  • iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Arithmetic
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Remember your multiplication tables? ... me neither. Brush up on your multiplication, ...

Remember your multiplication tables? ... me neither. Brush up on your multiplication, division, and factoring skills with this exciting game. No calculators allowed! The students will be given mutiplication and division problems which they must answer. They also have the option of being given a number then stating the factors of how that number was attained using either multiplication or division.

Subject:
Mathematics
Numbers and Operations
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
PhET Interactive Simulations
Date Added:
05/01/2006
Ball Bounce Experiment
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Educational Use
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Students investigate different balls' abilities to bounce and represent the data they ...

Students investigate different balls' abilities to bounce and represent the data they collect graphically.

Subject:
Technology and Engineering
Education
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
TeachEngineering
Author:
Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,
Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University
TeachEngineering.org
Tufts University
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Counting down from 11: Analysis of Point of View in "Eleven" by Sandra Cisneros
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In this lesson, students create their own definitions of a child and ...

In this lesson, students create their own definitions of a child and a tween and use their definitions to guide their reading of the short story "Eleven" by Sandra Cisernos. After collecting text evidence, students will develop their own argument about the point of view of the narrator in the story through discussion and writing. In the closing activity, students will also write a found poem.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Date Added:
10/31/2012
Estimating: Counting Trees
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students ...

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: solve simple problems involving ratio and direct proportion; choose an appropriate sampling method; and collect discrete data and record them using a frequency table.

Subject:
Education
Geometry
Measurement and Data
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
U.C. Berkeley
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Author:
http://map.mathshell.org/
Date Added:
11/01/2017
Honeybee Mystery--a Comprehension Instructional Sequence Lesson Plan
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In this lesson tied to Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, ...

In this lesson tied to Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, students receive support as they read a complex informational text about honeybees. The teacher facilitates a close reading and writing a response-to-text.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Wendy Shelden
Date Added:
11/02/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois
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In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to ...

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Who was a stronger advocate for African-Americans, Booker T. Washington or W.E.B. DuBois? The teacher first uses a mini-lecture and a streaming video clip from Discovery Education to explain late 19th-century race relations in the South. Students then analyze an excerpt from Washington‰ŰŞs ‘Atlanta Compromise‰ŰŞ speech as the teacher models‰ŰÓextensively‰ŰÓsourcing, contextualization, corroboration, and close reading techniques, answering questions on a graphic organizer. Students then do the same, on their own, with a selection from DuBois‰ŰŞ Souls of Black Folk. A final class discussion evaluates the 2 men: who was more right in his approach, given the historical context?

Subject:
Education
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
10/26/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Civil Rights Act
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In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to ...

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Was JFK a strong supporter of Civil Rights? First, the teacher streams a video clip from Discovery Education on JFK and civil rights. Students form a hypothesis and discuss whether JFK was ‘strong‰ŰŞ on civil rights based on this. Students then read a 1963 JFK speech supporting the Civil Rights Act; as a class, they answer sourcing, close reading and context questions and revisit their hypothesis. Students then read John Lewis‰ŰŞs controversial original draft of the speech he delivered at the March on Washington. They answer guiding questions which corroborate both documents and attempt to reach a conclusion. If there is time, the teacher may bookend the lesson with another clip which shows how LBJ signed the eventual law into action.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
11/06/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Great Society
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In this lesson, students analyze primary and secondary source documents in an ...

In this lesson, students analyze primary and secondary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Was the Great Society successful? Students first read LBJ‰ŰŞs “Great Society” speech and answer sourcing, close reading and context questions about it before discussing as a class. The teacher then hands out a list of Great Society programs and asks: Which have you heard of? Which do you think were successful? Students then watch a film clip about the Great Society, streamed via Discovery Education. This is followed up with 2 secondary sources: a “Pro” perspective from historian Joseph Califano and a “Con” perspective from Thomas Sowell. They fill out a graphic organizer in groups and discuss: Which historian is more convincing? What kind of evidence does each use to make his case? How do these arguments still play out today?

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
11/06/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Hamilton vs. Jefferson
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In this lesson, students analyze two primary source documents in an effort ...

In this lesson, students analyze two primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: What were the differences between [Alexander] Hamilton and [Thomas] Jefferson? Students first read a textbook summary/description (not included) of the Hamilton/Jefferson dynamic. Then, students are given a letter by each man‰ŰÓboth addressed to George Washington and written on the same day‰ŰÓeach of which addresses the ongoing feud with the other man. In pairs, students read the documents and answer sourcing, corroboration, contextualization, and close reading questions, including some intriguing ones which encourage students to “pick sides” in the rivalry.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
09/29/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Homestead Strike
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In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to ...

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did the Homestead Strike turn violent? The teacher first recaps labor/industry relations of the era and introduces the Homestead Strike with a timeline. The teacher then models sourcing and close reading techniques with a document: Emma Goldman‰ŰŞs 1931 autobiography. Students then do the same with an 1892 newspaper interview of Henry Frick, followed by corroboration guiding questions that pit the 2 authors against each other. In a final class discussion, students evaluate the validity of the sources and debate whether the historical “truth” about the strike is knowable.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
10/14/2012
Reading Like a Historian: King Philip's War of 1675
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This lesson challenges students to answer the central historical question: What caused ...

This lesson challenges students to answer the central historical question: What caused King Philip's War of 1675? After warming up with some historical background information, students are presented with 2 primary source documents: a 1675 document ostensibly representing King Philip's "perspective" (but actually written by a colonist) and a post-war query as to the war's causes instigated by the English government. Students then answer questions (sourcing, contextualization, close reading) to analyze the passages and work in pairs to answer a final corroboration question on the war's ultimate cause.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
09/22/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Loyalists
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In this brief lesson, students study the writings of Loyalists during the ...

In this brief lesson, students study the writings of Loyalists during the American Revolution in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did some colonists support England and oppose independence? After a brief teacher introduction establishing historical context, students will read read 2 primary source documents: 1) a pamphlet by Charles Inglis, Anglican minister, explaining the many drawbacks to American independence, and 2) an anonymous newspaper letter urging reconciliation with Britain. While reading, students complete a graphic organizer that applies sourcing, contextualization, corroboration, and close reading to each passage. A final class discussion asks students to draw a conclusion as to whether the Loyalists or Patriots were more reasonable.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
09/25/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Nat Turner
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In this lesson, students analyze 3 source documents in an effort to ...

In this lesson, students analyze 3 source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Was Nat Turner a hero or a madman? The lesson begins by first reading the class textbook‰ŰŞs account of the Nat Turner massacre and then reading a timeline which includes Turner's capture and execution. The teacher them models the first document, an excerpt from Thomas Gray‰ŰŞs Confessions of Nat Turner, by helping students answer sourcing, contextualization, corroboration, and close reading questions. Students then do the same with 2 more documents: a newspaper editorial contemptuous of Turner and an admiring 1843 speech by Henry Garnet to the National Negro Convention. Finally, students use all 3 documents to write a response to the central question and discuss as a class: what kind of person was Nat Turner?

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
09/30/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Pullman Strike
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In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to ...

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: How did Chicago newspapers cover the Pullman strike? The teacher begins by placing the Pullman strike in the context of other labor strikes and using a PowerPoint to convey basic information. Students are then divided into 4 groups, and each is given a different set of articles‰ŰÓ1 each from the Chicago Times and Chicago Tribune‰ŰÓand told to use close reading strategies to figure out which paper was biased against the strikers and which favored them. Finally, each group chooses a representative to present to the entire class how that group arrived at its conclusion.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
10/14/2012
Reading Like a Historian: Shays' Rebellion
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In this lesson, students analyze a primary source in an effort to ...

In this lesson, students analyze a primary source in an effort to answer the central historical question: How did Americans react to Shays‰ŰŞ Rebellion? Students read a textbook excerpt (included) about Shays‰ŰŞ Rebellion and a letter from Thomas Jefferson speaking about Shays‰ŰŞ rebels. Students answer questions that ask them to analyze the letter through sourcing, contextualization, close reading, and corroboration questions. A final class discussion corroborates the textbook passage and the Jefferson letter in an effort to challenge the popular account in which all Americans feared the rebellion.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
09/26/2012
Reading Like a Historian: U.S. Entry into WWI
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In this lesson, designed to follow a more general lesson on the ...

In this lesson, designed to follow a more general lesson on the causes and warring parties of WWI, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did the U.S. enter World War I? The teacher begins with a mini-lesson on Woodrow Wilson. Students then read 2 Wilson documents: 1) a 1914 speech urging American neutrality and 2) Wilson‰ŰŞs 1917 speech on the U.S. entry into the war. Students then read their class textbook‰ŰŞs explanation for the end of U.S. neutrality, followed by an excerpt from Howard Zinn‰ŰŞs People‰ŰŞs History of the United States. For all documents, students answer guiding questions which stress contextualization and close reading. A final class discussion evaluates Zinn‰ŰŞs views and compares them to the other sources.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
10/27/2012
Teaching Fractions, Percents and Ratios
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This is a college level math session for elementary and middle-school teachers. ...

This is a college level math session for elementary and middle-school teachers. In this session, we'll look at several topics related to fractions, percents, and ratios. As in earlier sessions, we'll look at graphical and geometric representations of these topics, as well as some of their applications in the physical world. As you work through the activities in this session, reflect on how mathematics is reasonable and logical, and how it is helpful to look for the logical patterns that emerge when you think about a mathematical situation.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Material Type:
Full Course
Interactive
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Annenberg Learner
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Author:
Annenberg Media
Date Added:
10/13/2017
Understanding Miss Maggie
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This lesson incorporates the use of think-pair-share, shared inquiry discussions, debating ideas, ...

This lesson incorporates the use of think-pair-share, shared inquiry discussions, debating ideas, supporting opinions with text-based evidence, and interpretive drawings to better understand complex text in 2nd grade literature.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Date Added:
01/22/2013
Using Dimensions: Designing a Sports Bag
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students ...

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: recognize and use common 2D representations of 3D objects and identify and use the appropriate formula for finding the circumference of a circle.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
U.C. Berkeley
Provider Set:
iCPALMS: A Standards-based K-12 Resources and Tools Pathway
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Author:
http://map.mathshell.org/
Date Added:
11/01/2017