All resources in Culturally-Relevant Text Sets

February 2, 2022 Recording Connect, Explore, Engage with Standards for Culturally-Relevant Text Sets

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View the recording of session with DPI Environmental Education Consultant, Victoria Rydberg to find out how these seven standards can help you connect, explore, and engage with environmental literacy in your curriculum! Designed and adopted by the state of Wisconsin in 2018, learn how these standards provide educators with strong themes to design text-sets for culturally-relevant learning.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Sandy Benton

Recording March 9, Using Primary Source: Advancing EE through Culturally-Responsive Text Sets

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Cynthia Bachhuber, introduces us to the wide range of sources available and delve into how historians use these sources to construct our histories. We’ll explore how archives are created, what it means to use these materials as a critical thinker, and how you can access physical and digital primary sources as an educator. Primary source material may be included as texts as you develop your text sets in this project. Find out how historical resources can support learning in all content areas. Speaker: Cynthia Bachhuber is a librarian/archivist at the Wisconsin Historical Society where she focuses on outreach & instruction - making history accessible and relevant.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Sandy Benton

Resources from Chats: Advancing EE through Culturally-Relevant Text Sets

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The collaborative online conversations and chats have resulted in document of resources entered into the chats for each of the sessions of Advancing Environmental Literacy through Culturally-Relevant Text Sets. The document is a work in progress and contributions of group members will be added and revised with on ongoing collaborations.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Sandy Benton

Iskigamizigan (Sugarbush)

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Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe School has an annual sugarbush within a few miles of the school.  During the Spring sugarbush season, students are bussed to the site, by class, to do the variety of daily tasks required to successfully produce maple syrup.  The LCO middle school students follow the Ojibwe traditions.  They hear the traditional stories, learn words and phrases in the Ojibwemowin language, tap trees, collect and boil sap, chop wood and build fires. The students learn about tree identification, photosynthesis, and aging trees using cross sections.  They also learn about the importance and uses of Maple trees.  The students learn that the environmental conditions needed to make maple syrup are only found in a very small part of the world that includes Wisconsin.  The combination of hands-on exploration and culturally - relevant texts personalize the learning experience for this region.   

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Authors: Rick Erickson, Tammy Moncel

Mandaamin, Mashkodesimin, Okosimaan: The Three Sisters (Corn, Beans, Squash/Pumpkin)

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Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe school is a Bureau of Indian Education/Tribally controlled school catering to students who are themselves tribally enrolled or a descendant of a tribal member. Our school has a close working relationship with the Lac Courte Oreilles College Extension program, including access to the college farm. In an effort to encourage students to learn where their food comes from, make more informed decisions about what they eat and how what they eat impacts the environment, students are introduced to indigenous teachings regarding companion planting of food crops. Though the growing part of this project is long term, students learn about the process of seed development, understand the length of time it takes for a plant to mature and ultimately provide food sources. An additional benefit to this project is that it provides students with a sense of nurturing as they help their plants thrive. 

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson, Lesson Plan

Authors: Rick Erickson, Wendy Fuller

THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON PHENOLOGY OF INDIGENOUS NATURAL RESOURCES

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The Bayfield High School Ojibwe Language Course focuses on teaching traditional Ojibwe lifeways while using the Ancestral language. Students will learn how the Ojibwe people historically depended on natural resources for their survival. One activity that occurs in the spring is the investigation of Plant Phenology. The students will further their investigation by looking into reasons why the Phenology of certain plants vary. The students will focus on the impact of climate change and how it poses many risks to phenological events in the plants used by the Great lakes Ojibwe. Students will list various plants, research, and record the phenological events of the plants. Students will compare their observations with the previous year to determine if the plants are impacted by Climate change.  Local tribal elders and harvesters provide traditional stories and observations to gain a historical information on plant phenology. Through this activity, Bayfield students learn about how climate change can alter the phenology of some plant species and might impact traditional harvesting.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Authors: Rick Erickson, rebecca boyd

The Power of Indigenous Knowledge and the Importance of Land to the Anishinaabe People

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This unit will use a variety of resources to show issues related to Indigenous lands, explain some of the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas history and discuss how the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas is going about reclaiming tribal traditional lands, and how Indigenous people have a traditional, cultural, and spiritual connection with the lands that they reside on.This unit will use a podcast, youtube video, news articles, and traditional storytelling in hopes the students will be able to see the importance of gaining knowledge. After this unit they will learn about the Power of Indigenous Knowledge!

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Authors: Rick Erickson, Brian Boyd

Ma’iingan (Wolf)

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Context: The Bayfield High School Alternative Education program works collaboratively with the Red Cliff Treaty Natural Resources (TNR) Division on a variety of projects. One of the favorite projects focuses on monitoring carnivores in the Red Cliff/Bayfield area. One component of this project involves the placement of several remote trail cameras within local natural areas. TNR staff help students identify potential camera location areas. Several times throughout the school year, students retrieve the memory cards from the cameras and record observations based on the photos and videos. A second component of this project involves TNR providing the students with regular updates regarding progress of their ma’iingan (wolf) studies. TNR has access to data obtained from radio and GPS collared ma’iinganag (wolves) from a variety of local packs. Through this project, Bayfield students learn about wolf ecology, the cultural value of wolves, and connections to their immediate surroundings.

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Authors: Sandy Benton, Rick Erickson