UW-System Libraries

This is a group for UW-System librarians to share open access learning objects addressing information literacy concepts, research tools and processes, and other research tasks that could benefit librarians across system.
24 members 7 affiliated resources

All resources in UW-System Libraries

How to Read a Scholarly Article

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This is an open access tutorial on how to read scholarly articles created by UW-Madison Libraries. It is interactive and developed in Articulate Storyline 360. It is fully-accessible. Aligned with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy: Frame - Scholarship as a Conversation. Learning outcomes: 1. identify parts of a scholarly article to determine relevance and quality. 2. articles vary by discipline, and strategies for reading to understand an articleTo access tutorial, select view resource. 

Material Type: Interactive

Author: Alex Stark

What are scholarly sources?

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This video created by the UWM Libraries describes the author, audience, and purpose of scholarly souces, and why/how undergraduates engage with them.Learning outcome: Students will be able to describe the author, article, and purpose of scholarly sources in the context of undergraduate research and writing.ACRL Frame Alignment: Scholarship as a conversation

Material Type: Other

Author: Heidi Anoszko

Evaluating Sources Tutorial

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An interactive tutorial, created with LibWizard by UW-EauClaire McIntyre Library.  Students practice evaluation of sources with real-world examples by assessing relevance, credibility, purpose and audience.  They learn to avoid misinformation with fact-checking techniques (like reading laterally) and to consider authority critically.ACRL frames: Authority Is Constructed and Contextual, Searching as Strategic Exploration

Material Type: Interactive, Learning Task

Author: Liliana LaValle

When to Cite

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Citation parts help us identify different voices and perspectives in the broader conversation about a subject. For example, publication dates can tell us who shared an idea or finding first. This video explains plagiarism in terms of what scholars should do and models identifying when and why to credit others.Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify ethical ways to engage with the ideas and research of others.ACRL Frame Alignment: Scholarship as a conversation, information has value

Material Type: Other

Author: Heidi Anoszko