Author:
The genius group from Madison Wisconsin
Subject:
Character Education, Elementary Education, English Language Arts, Reading Informational Text, Biology, World Cultures
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Lower Primary, Upper Primary
Tags:
  • Cultures
  • Day of the Dead
  • Life Cycles
  • Mexico
  • Migration
  • Monarch Butterflies
  • Science
    License:
    Public Domain Dedication
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Graphics/Photos

    Education Standards

    Third grade Cultivating Genius Framework science "How is conserving monarchs important to the preservation of the culture of Mexico? "

    Third grade Cultivating Genius Framework science "How is conserving monarchs important to the preservation of the culture of Mexico? "

    Overview

    Details: This lesson can be added to the study of the life cycle of the monarch butterfly, specifically when the children are learning about monarch migration. It is suggested to use this lesson after Monarch Butterflies Lesson 1. 

    Pursuits: Identity is questioning who you are, how others see you and who you want to become. Students will learn about each other and further define their own identities in relation to their culture, their families and their culture. 

    Skills are writing, collaborating with others, and reading informational texts 

    Criticality: Students are deepening their understanding of the intersections of a group's culture with the economic and land-use expectations of the economic powers of the world. In this case the people in the lesson chose to follow their traditions and culture  over these expectations and found an alternative path to support themselves economically. 

    How is conserving monarchs important to the preservation of the culture of Mexico?

    Lesson 

    Overview

    (60-75 minutes)

    Details: This lesson can be added to the study of the life cycle of the monarch butterfly, specifically when the children are learning about monarch migration. It is suggested to use this lesson after Monarch Butterflies Lesson 1. 

     

    Pursuit addressed: Toward the pursuits of Criticality, Skills, Identity, Intellectuality 

    Pursuits: Identity is questioning who you are, how others see you and who you want to become. Students will learn about each other and further define their own identities in relation to their culture, their families and their culture. 

    Skills are writing, collaborating with others, and reading informational texts 

    Criticality: Students are deepening their understanding of the intersections of a group's culture with the economic and land-use expectations of the economic powers of the world. In this case the people in the lesson chose to follow their traditions and culture  over these expectations and found an alternative path to support themselves economically. 

     

    Driving Question: How is conserving monarchs important to the preservation of the culture of Mexico? 

     

    Lesson Snapshot 

    Note: There is an optional homework assignment for students to fill out beforehand with their family members. If this step has been completed, share the homework presentation-style before the lesson or on a daily basis at a different time (for example, during morning meeting) 

     
    1. Introduction: What is culture? Show Flocabulary video: Culture (4 minutes) note: The video is free but you may need to sign up to access the video. Introduce DQ. Discuss. 

    2. Analyzing Data: Show the last 3 minutes of Lesson 1 video, showing the “discovery” of the monarchs’ overwintering site, starting at 3:06

    3. Small group discussion:  Students can use the Student Response sheet as support for discussion in small groups.       

           4.    Read aloud (or listen to): Uncle Monarch and the Day of the Dead by Judy Goldman

           5.    Discussion around Day of the Dead and its connection to monarch butterflies

     

    Building towards PE: 3-LS1-1. Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death. 

                    

    Learning Performances

     

    Students will gather information from media and texts to analyze information about the stability and change and of Mexican culture regarding the migration patterns of monarchs throughout centuries reflecting their unique and diverse life cycles

    Lesson Component

    How to Implement 

    Common Core State Standards for Literacy

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1

    Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers

     

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.3

    Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events

     

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1

    Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

     

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.3.3

    Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

    Materials and Prep

     

    Materials

    Preparation 

    • If you will be using the homework, send it home a day or two before the lesson for students to fill out with their families. 

    • Schedule time for the homework sharing if this is a step you will do 

    • Make enough copies of the student response sheet so that each small group has one copy to fill out together. 

    • Ensure the video link is in working order. 

    • You may want to have the pairs chosen beforehand, pairing for cooperation and communication. 

    What are kids figuring out?

    Students figure out  that the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly has played an important role in the identity and culture of Mexico which is one reason why conserving monarchs is important to the Mexican people.

     

    Look fors

     Look for students comparing the stability of the migration patterns of the Monarchs and the changes that Mexicans have made in order to maintain an aspect of culture that is important. 

    1

    Introduction

    (15 min)

    Engaging with Phenomenon and DQ

    1. Teacher: In our last lesson, we learned that the “discovery” of the monarchs’ overwintering site

    was an international effort. Today we are going to delve into that a bit more. We will also learn about the ways that the Mexican people have worked to conserve the monarchs’ winter habitat and how the monarchs are important to their cultural ties. (Intellect)

     
    1. Show Flocabulary video: Culture and discuss: What are some of your cultural ties? (Identity)

    2. Introduce DQ

    2

    Gathering Information from media 

    (5 minutes) 

    1. Tell students that they’re going to watch the last couple of minutes of the “discovery” of monarchs video that we watched in the last lesson. 

    2. Show video starting at 3:06. Ask them to pay attention to the way that Catalina is portrayed for her work in helping to find the monarchs’ overwintering site. 

    3. Ask students to pay attention to the ways that the overwintering site has always been important to the people of Mexico. (Identity)

    3.

    Analyzing data

    (15 minutes)

    1. Ask what the students noticed about the way Catalina was portrayed in the National Geographic article? Possible questions: Why do you think this may have happened? Why do you think that they called her “Cathy” in the article?  (Criticality)

    2. You may want to show slide 1 as a reminder

    3. Discuss what the students noticed about the way the Mexican people care for the monarchs’ overwintering site. What have they changed about the way they make money near the monarch overwintering site? How are these things critical in the care of the monarchs? (Intellect, Criticality)

    4. You may want to show slide 2 and 3 as reminders

    5. Student Response should be completed in cooperative groups. (Skills)

    6. Groups share their ideas

    emphasize.JPG

    Supporting Student Discourse: In whole class discussions, support students to do the following: listen to each other, ask questions to check their understanding of others’ comments, explain their own ideas and understanding clearly, and build on one-another’s ideas. 

                  Emphasize ideas by pointing out those ideas that use the text and video. 

    Possible Questions: 

    What were the words that Tio Urbano said to Lupita when a monarch landed on her hand? How did Lupita’s family get ready for Dia de Muertos? 

     

    Shared Reading and discussion 

    (25 minutes) 

     
    1.  Read aloud (or listen to): Uncle Monarch and the Day of the Dead by Judy Goldman

     
    1. Discussion: Some  possible questions: 

    • What is the Day of the Dead? 

    • What is the connection between the monarchs and Day of the Dead? 

    • If the monarchs didn’t arrive in Mexico every year, how would that change the culture of this celebration? (Intellectuality)

    • What is a celebration that is important to your family? Are there similarities in the ways that you celebrate and the Mexican people celebrate? (Identity)

    Formative Assessment

    Look Fors

    1. Look for students showing in words that they understand that the people living around the monarch overwintering site used to plant crops and now they plant trees.

     

    1. Look for students showing in words that they understand that the people living around the monarch overwintering site make a living in a way that includes caring for the monarchs. (i.e. selling tickets to the sanctuary, selling food to the monarch tourists, selling souvenirs to the monarch tourists, renting horses to get the tourists to the site, and being a paid guide to get the tourists to and from the site safely.

     
    1. Look for students showing in words that they understand that these jobs benefit the monarchs too. (i.e. They are helping to educate the tourists and helping to instill a love for these insects. When more people love them, they will be more likely to help them when they get home . . . planting milkweed, growing plants that monarchs eat, not using pesticides. Also, if the people living around the sanctuary didn’t have jobs, they might feel the need to use the land in ways that might unintentionally harm the monarchs.)

     
    1. During sharing do other students listen to what their peers are sharing. Are the listeners able to paraphrase what their classmates say?

     

    Evidence Statement 

    Student responses will reflect the various changes that the people in the video made in reaction to the migration patterns of the Monarchs to support their survival during one stage in their life cycles.