Author:
The genius group from Madison Wisconsin
Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, Character Education, Biology
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • Cultivating Genius
  • Five Pursuits
  • Invasive Species
  • Plants
  • Soil
  • Structure
  • Wants and Needs
  • Worms
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Video

    Education Standards

    Kinder Cultivating Genius framework science "What do plants need to survive?"

    Kinder Cultivating Genius framework science "What do plants need to survive?"

    Overview

    This lesson is for kindergarteners as they study the needs for survival of plants and animals. The students gather information about an invasive species that changes the soil so that plants have a more difficult time getting nutrients. They learn what they can do to help in preventing the spread of these species. 

     

    Pursuits addressed: 

    Identity: This lesson addressed the 'who you desire to be' part of Identity. The scientist that is spotllighted in this video is a non-traditional scientist who is African and studies worms. Students who are of African descent or African American and any student who may feel that the doors to science careers may be closed to them due to the color of their skin, may feel encouraged by this video to nurture the possibility of being a scientist. The fact that this scientist studies something that many students may be interested in may foster new ideas that scientists can be people who spend a lot of time outdoors looking at interesting things.

     Intelligence: This lesson gives students real-world knowledge and some tools to make a difference in their community with this knowledge. It has immediate implications in the students' lives. 

    What do plants need to survive?

     

    Lesson 

    Overview

    (Time est

    45 minutes)

    What Do Plants Need to Survive? 

    Pursuits addressed: 

    Identity: This lesson addressed the 'who you desire to be' part of Identity. The scientist that is spotllighted in this video is a non-traditional scientist who is African and studies worms. Students who are of African descent or African American and any student who may feel that the doors to science careers may be closed to them due to the color of their skin, may feel encouraged by this video to nurture the possibility of being a scientist. The fact that this scientist studies something that many students may be interested in may foster new ideas that scientists can be people who spend a lot of time outdoors looking at interesting things. 

    Intelligence: This lesson gives students real-world knowledge and some tools to make a difference in their community with this knowledge. It has immediate implications in the students' lives. 

    Lesson Snapshot 

    1. Introduction: Introduce the DQ for the learning, What Do Plants Need to Survive? Students turn-and-talk and then share out ideas. Show the students the two kinds of soil picture (slide 1). . Ask students if they think plants could survive in both types of soil? Is one soil better for plants than the other? Ask for evidence. 

    2. Making Real-world Connection: Show this slide show. Explain that there are scientists who study worms for their work. Introduce the scientist Mr Bheka Nxele and show his picture to the class. In one slide he is working; another includes his photo. Explain that his work is looking for and counting different kinds of worms. 

    3. Analyzing Data: Show the slide of the different kinds of worms and ask if the students can see any differences between them. Then show the video. Ask: Is that how normal worms act? Students turn-and-talk and share out. 

    4. Role Play: If there’s room in the classroom, have students lie down on the rug or floor and practice the two kinds of movements: The kind that an earthworm does and the kind a jumping worm does. Ask students to think about how they are different. 

    The Two Kinds of Soil Picture: Remind students that they already thought about this picture. Which kind of soil is better for plants? 

    Communicating Information: Show the slide with the ‘things they can do’ on it. Discuss whole-group if there’s someone they know that might like to know about checking plants for jumping worms. Is there some other way they can help the community with this information about worms as scientists? Discuss. 

    1. Wrap Up:  Add questions to the DQ Board.  Wonder aloud about how if this worm’s structure is different from the earth worm’s structure that helps it jump like it does? 

     

    Learning Performances

    Students will gather data from the media about the different  structures and their functions of native and non-native species and how one species may be better at surviving in the environment than the other. 



     

    Building toward PE(s)

    LS1.1 Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.*

    Materials and Prep

     

    Teacher  Materials

     

    Student  Materials

    • Science notebooks

    Preparation 

    • Have the DQ Board ready for answering the question. 

    What are Students figuring out?

    Students are figuring out that worm science has real-world connections. They can help their community by learning about worms and communicating what they know to others. 

     

    Look Fors

    Look for students describing the different features a worm might need to ‘jump instead of ‘crawl.’

    1

    Introduction

    (10  min)

    Introduction: Engage with Phenomenon and Lesson DQ, How can science help our community? 

     
    1. Remind students that the LS DQ is How is a worm like a first grader? Ask students how they have been like scientists during science during in this learning set? Students turn-and-talk and then share out ideas. 

    2

    Making a Real-World Connection through Text and Media 

    (10 min) 

    Gather information about how worm scientist practice their profession

     
    1. Show the second slide  of the slide show.  Explain that there are scientists who study worms for their work as scientists. Introduce Mr. Bheka Nxele (in one slide he is working and the other is just a picture of him) and use what they discover to help the world.

    2. Explain that his work is looking for different kinds of worms and counting the different kinds. 

    help student apply thinking to another.JPG

    Discourse Move - Help students apply their thinking to others’ ideas

    Support students in finding the right words to use to express how they are moving when they are crawling and moving from a crawl to a jump. If a student uses a word to describe it, ‘coin’ that word as the word for that movement in the discussion when asking questions of others or asking another student to describe it. 

    Analyzing Data 

    (10  min) 

    Analyzing Data: Identify differences in real worms 

     
    1. Show the slide of the different kinds of worms and ask if the students can see any differences between them. 

    2. Then show the video. Ask: Is that how normal worms act? Students turn-and-talk and share out. 

    4

    Role Play 

    (10 min)

    Role Play: Practice moving like a jumping worm and an earthworm

     
    1. If there’s room in the classroom, have students lie down on the rug or floor and practice the two kinds of movements: The kind that an earthworm does and the kind a jumping worm does. 

    2. Or ask one student at a time to demonstrate if there isn’t room in the classroom to recreate the movement all together. 

    3. Ask students to think about how they are different. 

    5

    Analyzing Data/ Classroom Discussion (Soil slide and things they can do) 

    Students analyze and compare  images 

     
    1. Read the caption between the two kinds of soil.

    2. Ask students to look at the picture of what happens to the soil when jumping worms come into the area. 

    3. How is the soil different? Which soil do you think is better for growing plants? Ask for evidence. 

    4. Show the slide with the ‘things they can do’ on it. 

    5. Discuss whole-group if there’s someone they know that might like to know about checking plants for jumping worms. 

    6.  Is there some other way they as scientists can help the community with this information about worms? Turn-and-talk and have one or two kids share out.  

     

    Wrap Up

    (5  min)

    DQ Board and final claim 

    1. Wonder aloud about whether this worm’s structure is different from the earth worm’s structure and this difference that helps it jump like it does? Wonder why the difference in structure would have such an effect on how good the soil is for plants. 

    2. Ask students to give a 'thumbs up' if they are going to tell a grownup they know about jumping worms. 

    Note: You may want to check students the next morning to ask if anyone told their grownups about it and what they said. 

    Formative Assessment

    Look Fors 

    Look for students describing the different features a worm might need to ‘jump’ instead of ‘crawl’. 

     

    Evidence Statement 

    Students discuss things they can do with worm science in their community to help the plants stay healthy. . 

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worm