Search Resources

13 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • WI.ELA-Literacy.W.3.5
3rd Grade Opinion Writing Unit - Lesson 8: Focused Editing
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Overview: Students will use COPS and the focused edit strategy to practice editing and then edit their opinion paper.W.3.1: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. I can write opinion pieces and support my opinion with reasons.W.3.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3 here.) I can develop and strenghten my writing by planning, revising, and editing with the help of my peers and an adult. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Michelle Simpson
Date Added:
05/28/2020
3rd Grade Opinion Writing Unit - Lesson 9: Focused Revising (and Editing)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Overview: Students will use a focused revising choice board to guide peer writing conferences. The teacher and students will use a focused revising choice board to guide teacher writing conferences.W.3.1: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. I can write an opinion piece and support my opinion with reasons.W.3.5: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3 here.) I can develop and strengthen my writing by planning, revising, and editing with the help of my peers and an adult.

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Michelle Simpson
Date Added:
05/29/2020
3rd Grade Opinion Writing Unit Outline
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This is the outline for a third grade writing unit on writing opinion (persuasive) papers. The lessons and materials are linked to the outline, but they also uploaded in a PDF format as sperate lessons in WISELearn. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Michelle Simpson
Date Added:
05/29/2020
Engaging With Cause-and-Effect Relationships Through Creating Comic Strips
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating

In order to fully comprehend reading materials, students need to understand the cause-and-effect relationships that appear in a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts. In this lesson, students learn cause-and-effect relationships through the sharing of a variety of Laura Joffe Numeroff picture books in a Reader's Workshop format. Using online tools or a printed template, students create an original comic strip via the writing prompt, "If you take a (third) grader to."  Students use various kinds of art to illustrate their strip and publish and present their completed piece to peers in a read-aloud format.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Literacy Association
Date Added:
12/15/2016
Grade 3 ELA Module 2A
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this module, students will use literacy skills to become experts— people who use reading, writing, listening and speaking to build and share deep knowledge about a topic. (This focus on research intentionally builds Module 1, in which students explored the superpowers of reading.) The module will begin with a class study of the bullfrog, an example of a “true frog,” that exhibit quintessentially froggy characteristics. In Unit 2, students will form research groups to become experts on various “freaky” frogs—frogs that push the boundaries of “froginess” with unusual adaptations that help them to survive in extreme environments throughout the world. Students will build their reading, research, writing and collaborative discussion skills through studying their expert frog. Throughout the module, students will consistently reflect on the role of literacy in building and sharing expertise. Students will demonstrate their expertise through a “freaky frog trading card”—a research-based narrative that highlights their research and educates others about the amazing diversity of frogs with a focus on how their freaky frog survives.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
11/12/2012
Grade 3 ELA Module 2B
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this module, students will use literacy skills to build expertise—using reading, writing, listening, speaking, and collaborative skills to build and share deep knowledge about a topic. This focus on research intentionally builds on Module 1, in which students explored the superpowers of reading. Specifically, students will seek evidence of culture, which can be thought of as the story of a group of people constructed through the generations; it can be evidenced through ancient and modern-day customs and traditions. The module will begin with a class study of the culture of Japan: Students will read Magic Tree House: Dragon of the Red Dawn, a book set in ancient Japan, paired with Exploring Countries: Japan, an informational text about modern Japan.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/02/2014
Grade 3 ELA Module 3B
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this eight-week module, students explore the questions: “Who is the wolf in fiction?” and “Who is the wolf in fact?” They begin by analyzing how the wolf is characterized in traditional stories, folktales, and fables. Then they research real wolves by reading informational text. Finally, for their performance task, students combine their knowledge of narratives with their research on wolves to write a realistic narrative about wolves.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
06/02/2014
Introduction to Units of Study for Writing
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

This is a quick overview for teachers of the Units of Study for Writing structure (K-8). There is also reference to upcoming professional development surrounding the Units of Study for Writing. This was used for a 20 minute staff meeting presentation prior to implementing the Units of Study for Writing.

Subject:
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Other
Author:
Megan Elmhorst
Date Added:
01/16/2020
Q is for Duck: Using Alphabet Books with Struggling Writers
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating

This five- part writing lesson is aimed at the middle elementary grades. After a read- aloud, students guess why the authors chose to represent each letter with a particular word and then summarize the pattern of the book. Students use the pattern to create their own class alphabet book.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Provider:
The Reading Teacher
Date Added:
04/28/2016
Thundering Tall Tales: Using Read-Aloud as a Springboard to Writing
Rating

This lesson uses the book Thunder Rose by Jerdine Nolen to reinforce the common elements, or text structure, of tall tales. As the text is read aloud, students examine the elements of the book that are characteristic of tall tales. Then using what they've learned over the course of the unit and lesson, they write tall tales of their own.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Read Write Think
Date Added:
03/20/2018
Using Picture Books to Teach Setting Development in Writing Workshop
Rating

After reading Water Hole Waiting by Jane Kurtz and Christopher Kurtz, or another book that has a well-developed setting, students work as a class to chart the use of the three elements of setting in the story, using specific words and examples from the text. Students then discuss the techniques that the book’s author used to develop the setting, making observations and drawing conclusions about how authors make the setting they write about vivid and believable. Next, students work in small groups to analyze the setting in another picture book, using an online graphic organizer. Finally, students apply what they have learned about how authors develop good settings to a piece of their own writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Literacy Association/ National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
01/01/2015