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  • WI.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.5
Analyzing Grammar Pet Peeves
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Students analyze grammatical pet peeves with the intent to see how these errors may connect to race, class, and audience expectation.  This resource is a way to study "proper" language usage.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
NCTE
Date Added:
11/10/2015
Blogtopia: Blogging about Your Own Utopia
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After studying utopian literature, students design their own utopian society, publishing the explanation of their ideal world on a blog. As they blog about their utopia, students establish the habits, practices, and organizing social structures that citizens will follow in their utopian societies. They begin by brainstorming ideas about what a perfect society would be like and then, in groups, begin to plan their project. Next, they become familiar with the blogging process, including legal guidelines and the specific site they will be using. Over several class sessions, students work on their blogs comparing their work to a rubric. Finally, after students visit one another's blogs and provide constructive and supportive feedback, they reflect on their own work. The lesson plan includes alternative handouts for classrooms where computer or blog access is limited. In this alternative, students complete the same basic activities, but publish their work using a Flip Book.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Council of Teachers of English
Date Added:
11/12/2015
Draw Significant and Relevant Evidence from a Text to Support Analysis
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This LearnZillion video models how to select significant and relevant evidence by selecting examples from a written text. The video reviews the writing process and provides an example thesis based on "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" and the development of concurrent themes. The process of choosing pieces of texual evidence that best support the thesis will be modeled.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment Item
Diagram/Illustration
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Learnzillion
Date Added:
11/03/2015
Finding Common Ground: Using Logical, Audience-Specific Arguments
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When students write argumentative or persuasive essays, they often ignore the viewpoints of their opponents, the potential readers of their essays. In this minilesson, students respond to a hypothetical situation by writing about their position on the subject. After sharing their thoughts with the class, students consider the opposite point of view and write about arguments for that position. They then compare their position with that of their potential audience, looking for areas of overlap. They then revise their arguments, with the audience's point of view and areas of commonality in mind. Examining the opposing view allows students to better decide how to counter their opponent logically, perhaps finding common ground from which their arguments might grow. Thus, the activity becomes a lesson not only in choosing arguments but also in anticipating audience reaction and adapting to it.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Provider:
NCTE
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Five Steps to Revision: Warm and Cool Feedback
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The overview for this lesson is for students to work together in peer review utilizing the strategy of warm and cool feedback based on the sixt traits of writing.  After this lesson, students will take the feedback that they have given to each other and revise their essay, specifically revising to show growth on the goals that they made over the course of this lesson.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Lesson Plan
Rubric/Scoring Guide
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Ghosts and Fear in Language Arts: Exploring the Ways Writers Scare Readers
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What is scary, and why does it fascinate us? How do writers and storytellers scare us? This lesson plan invites students to answer these questions by exploring their own scary stories and scary short stories and books. The lesson culminates in a Fright Fair, where students share scary projects that they have created, including posters, multimedia projects, and creative writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Alternate Assessment
Formative Assessment
Interactive
Interim/Summative Assessment
Learning Task
Lesson Plan
Reading
Date Added:
06/16/2015
Grade 11 ELA Module 2
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary and informational texts, focusing on how authors use word choice and rhetoric to develop ideas, and advance their points of view and purposes. The texts in this module represent varied voices, experiences, and perspectives, but are united by their shared exploration of the effects of prejudice and oppression on identity construction. Each of the module texts is a complex work with multiple central ideas and claims that complement the central ideas and claims of other texts in the module. All four module texts offer rich opportunities to analyze authorial engagement with past and present struggles against oppression, as well as how an author’s rhetoric or word choices strengthen the power and persuasiveness of the text.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/15/2014
Grade 11 ELA Module 3
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In Module 11.3, students engage in an inquiry-based, iterative process for research. Building on work with evidence-based analysis in Modules 11.1 and 12.2, students explore topics that have multiple positions and perspectives by gathering and analyzing research based on vetted sources to establish a position of their own. Students first generate a written evidence-based perspective, which will serve as the early foundation of what will ultimately become a written research-based argument paper. The research-based argument paper synthesizes and articulates several claims using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence to support the claims. Students read and analyze sources to surface potential problem-based questions for research, and develop and strengthen their writing by revising and editing.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/15/2014
Grade 11 ELA Module 4
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary texts, focusing on the authors’ choices in developing and relating textual elements such as character development, point of view, and central ideas while also considering how a text’s structure conveys meaning and creates aesthetic impact. Additionally, students learn and practice narrative writing techniques as they examine the techniques of the authors whose stories students analyze in the module.|

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
11/13/2014
Grade 12 ELA Module 1
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Module 12.1 includes a shared focus on text analysis and narrative writing. Students read, discuss, and analyze two nonfiction personal narratives, focusing on how the authors use structure, style, and content to craft narratives that develop complex experiences, ideas, and descriptions of individuals. Throughout the module, students learn, practice, and apply narrative writing skills to produce a complete personal essay suitable for use in the college application process.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
10/22/2014
Grade 12 ELA Module 3
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In Module 12.3, students engage in an inquiry-based, iterative research process that serves as the basis of a culminating research-based argument paper. Building on work with evidence-based analysis in Modules 12.1 and 12.2, students use a seed text to surface and explore issues that lend themselves to multiple positions and perspectives. Module 12.3 fosters students’ independent learning by decreasing scaffolds in key research lessons as students gather and analyze research based on vetted sources to establish a position of their own. Students first generate a written evidence-based perspective, which serves as the early foundation of what will ultimately become their research-based argument paper.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/09/2015
Keeper of the Culture Project
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I have used the Keeper of the Culture Project as a final assessment in Native American Literature. Students have the opportunity to follow up on a major theme in Mary Crow Dog's autobiography Lakota Woman: the importance of Native people embracing their identities and preserving traditions and culture. Students will interview and write about a person who is keeping the culture alive in some way and may invite the person to come in and speak or record an interview with that person.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Marketing Presentation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This lesson is based on observations of the marketing department at Reinhart Food Service. As a unit for Sports Literature class, students will complete a simulation to market and present a product using advertising techniques, digital media, writing and speaking skills. In groups of three to four students, each team with choose a product or aspect of a sport to market. Some examples include a new sporting goods store, online vendor, food product like a protein powder, drink or granola bar, themed restaurant, sports equipment. (Or use your imagination!) The product may be a one-of-a-kind-invention or an improvement on or variation of a current product. Students will learn advertising techniques, discuss morals in advertising, and practice their desktop publishing skills.

Marketing teams will consider their target audience and how they want to reach that audience. They will create an advertising plan and present their products, print, radio and television advertisements to the class.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Marketing, Management and Entrepreneurship
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Marcy Siolka
Date Added:
12/24/2018
Native American Cultural Children's Stories
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The cultural children's story project allows students to explore Native American culture through a new lens by authoring and illustrating children's stories that teach children between the ages of four and six a lesson or tale unique to Native cultural traditions. The exemplar stories are laminated, bound, and given as gifts to an area elementary school with a primarily Native student body. Student authors read the stories to the children, and the books become part of the children's classroom library. The children learn cultural traditions from a young age and see their mentors (often Native students as well) as role models and writers. The authors learn the skills to develop their stories from conception to publication to presentation.Cultural Children's Story Video Lesson

Subject:
Character Education
Early Learning
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
World Languages
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
05/07/2018
Native American Literature: The Evolution of Native American Representations in Film
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I include this assignment in my 11-12 Grade Native American Literature class. I usually introduce this unit after students have read the short story "This is What it Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona," by Sherman Alexie (Form his book The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven). The story (along with pieces of his other short stories) was the inspiration for the 1998 film Smoke Signals, one of the first authentic films to examine the humor, pain, loss and struggle of reservation life.After reading the story and watching the film, students write about what makes the film authentic and how forgiveness plays into the ability to move on.We then watch the documentary film Reel Injun (2009), chronicling the evolution of Native American portrayals in film. Next, students have the opportunity to discuss the attributes of authentic Native American depictions in film and what aspects of Native culture they would like to see in film.Finally, we finish the unit by looking at the impact of stereotypes in film, especially children's films, and students watch the Disney film Pocahantas (2005) through the lens of a movie critic and write a movie review based on the film, focusing on the authenticity of racial and cultural portrayals.Video Lesson: The Evolution of Native American Representations in Film

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Literature
Reading Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
05/18/2018
Native American Veterans Tribute
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The Native American Veterans Tribute is a slideshow project in Native American Literature class that corresponds with the Veterans Day Assembly at our high school. Veterans who are invited to the assembly are served breakfast and watch the slideshow in the Commons. Our class slideshow is incorporated into the presentation that day. It allows students to recognize relatives or or other Native military veterans and pay tribute to them.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Martha Handrick
Date Added:
08/02/2019
Podcasting To Personalize Feedback
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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A teacher records suggestions and comments on writing assignments as a podcast that students can access anytime and replay as needed. This allows for timely formative feedback.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Formative Assessment
Learning Task
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
10/04/2016
Slavery's Opponents and Defenders
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This lesson allows students to explore the different sides associated with the issue of slavery. It can be used for either cross-content lessons between English and Social Studies, as part of an argument unit in English, or as part of a larger unit in Social Studies. The learning objectives for the lesson are that students are able to identify those who are for and against slavery, understand how people used the U.S. Constitution to support their reasons for/against slavery, and the economic argument for or against slavery.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Reference Material
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Date Added:
12/28/2015