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An 1893 address to the World’s Woman’s Temperance Union by Frances Willard, president of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.
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This primary source is the speech given by Francis Willard, President of the World's Women's Temperance Union, at the organization's 20th annual convention. In it, she details women's roles in the Temperance Movement and how the Temperance Movement intersected with other social movements.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Digital Public Library of America
Francis E Willard
Date Added:
08/15/2022
Abraham Lincoln: Man versus Legend
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In this lesson, students interrogate their own assumptions about Abraham Lincoln in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of who Lincoln was. They investigate primary source documents in order to analyze the elements of Lincoln's life that have become legend and those that have been forgotten by history.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS Learning Media
Date Added:
07/31/2022
America's Black Holocaust Museum
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America's Black Holocaust Museum's website is a virtual museum where one can:
Discover seldom-told stories in our Online History Galleries.
Plan your in-person visit to our On-Site museum's galleries.
Find out what the only publicly-known survivor of a US lynching did with the rest of his long life.
Learn about present and past challenges facing the African American community in our Breaking News blog.

ABHM is a one-of-a-kind historical and memorial museum about the Black Holocaust in America.

Subject:
Social Studies
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Other
Author:
America's Black Holocaust Museum
Date Added:
06/28/2022
Comparing and Contrasting Inaugural Addresses
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Four Presidents called Illinois home – Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Ronald Reagan, and Barack Obama. Each presided over the country at a unique time in U.S. history, and this can be seen in the messages they communicated to the nation in their inaugural addresses. All four were reelected to a second term in office. Analysis of each president’s 1st and 2nd inaugural addresses provides an opportunity to compare and contrast the priorities, goals and intentions he outlined, as well as how the nation may have been changing at that time.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Abraham Lincoln Presidental Library and Museum
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Confronting Genocide: Never Again? - Choices Program
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Genocide is one of the tragic repeating features of history. It elicits feelings of horror and revulsion throughout the world. Yet both the international community and the United States have struggled to respond to this recurring problem. Confronting Genocide: Never Again? allows students to wrestle with the reasons why local actors, the international community, and the United States responded as they have to various cases of genocide over the past century. The unit is divided into two parts. Each part includes:

Student readings
Accompanying study guides, graphic organizers, and key terms
Lessons aligned with the readings that develop analytical skills and can be completed in one or more periods
Videos that feature leading experts

This unit also includes an Options Role Play as the key lesson and additional synthesis lessons that allow students to synthesize new knowledge for assessment. You do not need to use the entire unit; feel free to select what suits your classroom needs.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
The Choices Program Brown University
Date Added:
06/28/2022
Creating Columbus Day
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Using primary sources related to the official proclamation of Columbus Day as a holiday at the national level, this activity asks students to analyze the documents (official proclamation and a newspaper advertisement) to determine why President Harrison chose to declare it as a holiday. Accessing the lesson/document does require setting up free account.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Formative Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Benjamin Harrison
Stanford History Education Group
Date Added:
08/15/2022
Curriculum for Empowerment  (Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park)
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The National Park Service has created a K-12 curriculum that focuses on scaffolded lessons that focus on Martin Luther King’s advocacy, the March on Washington and other leaders of the Civil Rights movement.

Subject:
Character Education
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
The National Park Service
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Frances Willard Digital Journals
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History IT's mission is to digitize significant sources from US history. Among the items digitized are the diaries of Francis Willard. These journals are searchable using terms such as women's rights, suffrage, temperance, education, and many more.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Francis Willard
History IT
Date Added:
08/15/2022
George Washington Mini-lesson
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This mini-lesson looks at the variety of roles that George Washington played in America's early years. From commanding the Continental Army, to presiding over the Constitutional Convention, to setting the standard for the American presidency, Washington led the way.

Subject:
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Icivics
Date Added:
08/04/2022
HAPPY Analysis- History Document Set Lesson and Assessment Examples
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Template to guide students when analyzing primary and secondary sources. Teachers can use this template to create assessments that can be cycled and assessed multiple times throughout a grading period.

Subject:
Civics and Government
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Jake Boll
Date Added:
09/27/2022
Human Rights and Genocide: A Case Study of the First Modern Genocide of the 20th Century
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This comprehensive teacher’s manual focuses on the Armenian Genocide of 1915 during which 1.5 million Armenians, half of the Armenian population, were systematically annihilated. It includes a 1-day, 2-day, and 10-day unit with all the materials teachers will need, including more than two dozen overheads, interactive classroom exercises and more.
Discussions include a wide range of topics related to the Armenian Genocide: the history of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, primary source documents, witness and survivor memoirs, maps and political-economic timelines, and the problem of denial.

The lessons also consider the links between the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust, and capture other major human rights violations such as the Transatlantic Slave Trade, the Rape of Nanking, and the Cambodian and Rwandan genocides.

Comprehensive 1-Day, 2-Day, and 10-Day Lesson Plans for 10th Grade Public School Teachers.
Includes all supporting material – 209 pages
Fulfills mandated requirements in the History-Social Science Framework for California Public Schools.
Sponsored by the San Francisco Unified School District Office of Curriculum Improvement and Professional Development.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Genocide Education Project
Date Added:
06/28/2022
Ireland’s Great Hunger Activity Guide
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This packet provides an explanation of Ireland’s Great Hunger and provides ideas for primary source materials to use to describe the event A variety of discussion questions, writing activities, and other activities are provided that allow students to explore the facts and how different Irish artists used art and other media forms to depict the effects of the famine.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
The Great Hunger Mueseum
Date Added:
08/04/2022
Is It a Crime for a U.S. Citizen to Vote?
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Anthony’s speech helps students understand the Constitution as a living document. She uses a variety of techniques of legal reasoning and interpretation to challenge other, exclusionary uses of the document. She bases an argument for change on an interpretation of a founding document.
Reconstruction is a challenging era for students to understand. Anthony’s speech captures the complexities of the Reconstruction Amendments and how they opened new avenues for disenfranchised groups to assert their rights. It also explores the interrelationship of the women’s suffragists with other movements. Anthony highlights the cultural, social, and political aspects of women’s struggle for equal rights. The speech does not simply assert women’s right to vote, but also more broadly addresses the subordinate position of women within the home and in other areas of public policy.

Subject:
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
High School Lesson Plan created for Voices of Democracy by Michael J. Steudeman
Date Added:
08/01/2022
Lesson Plans · George Washington's Mount Vernon
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Collection of Lesson plans related to George Washington’s life, his service to his country, and his legacy. Lesson plans can be searched by grade level and topic.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
George Washington's Mount Vernon
Date Added:
08/04/2022
Martin Luther King Jr Day
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Enhance your classroom experience on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day with these teacher-tested lessons from the nationally recognized We the People: The Citizen & the Constitution curriculum. These materials will help inform your students about the national struggle for civil rights and equal protection under the law.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Center for Civics Education
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Menominee Ethnobotany 02 What is Ethnobotany?
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The students will develop an understanding of how ethnographers studied the Native American uses of plants in the Wisconsin region. They will learn specically about Menominee, Ojibwe, Potawatomi, and Meskwaki tribal uses of plants.

Subject:
Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources
Biology
Botany
Ecology
American Indian Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Ben Grignon
Date Added:
05/29/2019
Mildred Fish Harnack Collection from UW-Madison Libraries
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource offers a selection of primary sources related to Mildred Fish Harnack. These sources include: photos, admission papers, letters of recommendation, a poem written by Harnack, and an article related to outstanding UW Alumni. Mildred Fish Harnack's life before leaving for Germany comes to life through these sources.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Reference Material
Author:
UW-Madison Libraries
Date Added:
08/15/2022
Modern-Day Genocide, A Study of the Rohingya Minority in Burma
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"The Rohingya, a religious and ethnic minority in Burma, went from being citizens to outsiders and became the targets of a sustained campaign of genocide. By exploring the online exhibition Burma’s Path to Genocide, students learn how government policies and the proliferation of hate speech led to genocide of the Rohingya. Rohingya are still at risk of genocide today."

Subject:
Social Studies
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Date Added:
06/25/2022
Native Americans in World War II
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Overview / Description: This unit will examine the participation of Native Americans in World War II and their impact on the overall war effort. It will also look at the Native American perspective on the war and their participation. Guiding Questions: Why did Native Americans participate in WWII?What roles did Native Americans play in WWII?  How many Native Americans participated in WWII and what impact did they have on the overall war effort? In what ways did Native American participation in WWII connect to and/or change their cultural identity? What are some of the perspectives related to Native American participation in WWII? Learning goals/objectives:   Analyze primary and secondary sources related to the topic of Native American participation in World War II. Using information gathered, construct an argument about the presence of Native Americans in World War II. 

Subject:
American Indian Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jessica Pingel
Date Added:
05/10/2019
PBS LearningMedia American Veteran
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Follow individual trajectories of America’s diverse community of veterans as they join the military, experience deployments, and then return and adjust to civilian life. Analyze oral histories that describe the camaraderie of the veteran community, the struggles of engaging in combat, and the experiences—positive and negative—of returning to civilian life. Use their personal stories to engage in a discussion of how American veterans are treated by civilians during their service and on returning home from various conflicts.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Global Education
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS Learning Media
Date Added:
07/31/2022
PBS News Hour Martin Luther King Jr. Day Classroom Resources
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Use the following NewsHour Classroom resources to examine King’s impact on civil rights and his ongoing legacy. Lessons include a deep dive anayisis of the “I have a dream” speech and the impact of Dr, King’s work on current evens

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
PBS NewsHour
Victoria Pasquantonio
Date Added:
07/31/2022
Progressive Era Political Cartoons
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Cartoons in Sunday comic strips make us laugh. Political cartoons in the front section of the newspaper challenge us to think.

Because political cartoons present a particular point of view or story through symbolism and caricature, they are a particularly effective method for teaching history.

By interpreting political cartoons, students are encouraged to discover different points of view on the same historical event.

The three political cartoons in this section focus on Robert M. La Follette; they offer an additional opportunity to explore the progressive era in Wisconsin. Suggested activities, brief histories of each cartoon, a one-page biography of La Follette, and an introduction to cartoon analysis are also included.

Subject:
Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Wisconsin Historical Society
Date Added:
07/01/2022
SURVIVING IMPRISONMENT IN THE PACIFIC; THE STORY OF AMERICAN POWS
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By reading primary sources outlining the rights of prisoners of war, along with the primary accounts of American prisoners of war held by the Japanese, students should critically assess the nature of violations committed by the Japanese forces during World War II. Through this assessment, the students should be able to determine the specific ways Japanese forces violated the rights of American POWs. Students should also consider how the Geneva Conventions, and Japan’s lack of ratification, apply to the debates that surrounded Japanese war crimes at the postwar Tokyo Trials.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
World War II Mueseum
Date Added:
08/04/2022
Susan B. Anthony and the Struggle for Suffrage
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This brief lesson and collection of primary sources look at the arrest of Susan B. Anthony following her casting her ballot in the 1872 Presidential election in her hometown of Rochester, New York. Documents include U.S vs. Susan B. Anthony, Indictment for Illegal Voting; U.S. vs. Susan B. Anthony, Exhibit B, a transcript of the hearing including examination of witnesses by the defense and prosecution attorneys, and Susan B. Anthony s testimony in her own defense; and U.S. vs. Susan B. Anthony, Record of Conviction. It also offers extension activities and links to additional primary sources.

Subject:
Civics and Government
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
The National Archives
Date Added:
08/16/2022
Teacher Guide: Ghosts Of Rwanda
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"Asking students to grapple with an issue as horrible as genocide, termed 'the crime without a name' by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, is a daunting, wrenching, and, above all, sad challenge. Yet, as the film "Ghosts of Rwanda" shows, while people and governments turned their backs on what was happening in Rwanda in the spring of 1994, some individuals stood up to the horror and acted effectively, often with breathtaking heroism. Students can witness both the depths to which humans can sink and the heights to which they can soar. This guide offers classroom teachers an array of opportunities to teach history and to explore the notion of individual and collective responsibility."

Subject:
Social Studies
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Ellen Greenblatt of University High School
PBS
Simone Bloom Nathan of Media Education Consultants
Date Added:
06/29/2022
To Sign or Not to Sign
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On Constitution Day, students will examine the role of the people in shaping the United States Constitution. First, students will respond to a provocative statement posted in the room. They will then watch a video that gives a brief explanation of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, or listen as the video transcript is read aloud. A Constitution poster is provided so students can examine Article VII and discuss it as a class.
The elementary and middle school educator will then
guide students through a read-aloud play depicting two Constitutional Convention delegates who disagreed about ratifying the Constitution.

Subject:
Education
Elementary Education
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Social Studies
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
National Constitution Center
Date Added:
07/06/2022
Unit: Crimes Against Humanity and Civilization: The Genocide of the Armenians
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This series of eight lessons is organized as a mini-unit for teaching the Armenian Genocide. They were designed to complement Facing History and Ourselves' resource books, Holocaust and Human Behavior and Crimes Against Humanity and Civilization: The Genocide of the Armenians. Most of these lessons are designed to be used with the film The Armenian Genocide (Two Cats Productions), which aired on PBS on April 17, 2006 and is available to borrow from our library or stream if you are in our educator network. These texts depict, in words or images, evidence of horrible atrocities such as murder and starvation. We recommend previewing materials in order to gauge if they are appropriate given the maturity level of your students.

While we estimate that teaching all eight lessons would require approximately 10 hours of class time, we know that the actual pacing of these lessons depends on your students and your context. These lessons can also by used individually with the understanding that the later lessons rely on students' previous knowledge of the Armenian Genocide. It is our hope that you use these lessons as a jumping off point in creating learning experiences that will engage students in the history of the Armenian Genocide and the important questions this history raises about human behavior.

Language note: While this unit is titled "The Genocide of the Armenians," the word genocide did not exist in 1915 when the Armenians were being massacred and forced on death marches. To avoid historical anachronism, the first seven lessons of this unit circumvent the use of the word "genocide" with students. The final lesson introduces students to the modern term "genocide," and to the different ways people claim or deny this term. You might choose to introduce students to the term "genocide" earlier in the unit, while informing them that the events they are learning about inspired the genesis of this term.

Something to think about: The purpose of these lessons is to help students understand a particular moment in history, the Armenian Genocide, as a way to explore core questions about human behavior. While students are asked to travel across time and space in order to connect this history to their own ideas and experiences, it would be irresponsible for students to make generalizations about a particular religious or national group that cuts across time and place. In other words, students should be strongly discouraged from seeing this history as a lesson about all Turks, all Muslims, all Armenians, or all Americans, in the same way that scholars who teach about the Holocaust are careful not to condemn all Germans or all Christians for acts committed by the Nazis and their followers.

Background
In our increasingly interconnected world it has become clear that what happens in one country affects all of us in many ways, some more visible than others. Responding to genocide, ethnic violence, and abuses of human rights stand as the primary challenges of our day. There was great hope that the end of the Cold War would usher in a new era with a blossoming of democracy and human rights; instead violence around the world makes it clear that finding the tools to prevent genocide is as urgent as ever. Historians note that in the last hundred years more human beings died through genocidal violence and state-sanctioned murder than on that era's countless battlefields.

It was no accident that the failure to prevent escalating abuses of the human rights of Ottoman minorities climaxed with the systematic deportation and mass murder of the Armenian population of the empire in World War I. While other minority groups had broken free from the Ottoman Empire, the Armenians hoped that reforms--supported by the Western powers-would bring change. Instead a new nationalism spread through the Ottoman leadership that left no place for the Christian minorities within the empire. Under the cover of World War I the genocide of the Armenians began.

In 1915 journalists, politicians, and ordinary people considered how best to respond to the accounts of "horrors" and "outrages" in Turkey's Anatolian desert. Unable to remain silent, local and national leaders challenged tradition by boldly proclaiming that responsibility for human life does not stop at national borders. Their solutions set important precedents for international law. In fact, the phrase "crimes against humanity," made famous as one of the counts at the post-Holocaust Nuremberg Trials, was first used to describe the massacres of Armenian civilians in the spring of 1915.

As the pillaging of Armenian villages continued, diplomats debated questions of national sovereignty. In the absence of military intervention, coalitions of individuals, religious groups, and voluntary associations were able to raise millions of dollars to house and feed refugees from the slaughter. While those efforts saved many, humanitarian relief alone could not stop the mass murder of women, children, and men. In the wake of the genocide, official promises to hold the perpetrators accountable faded, as did support for the new Armenian state.

To many who had followed the bloody history of Turkey's campaign against its own people, the impunity enjoyed by those who had ordered and carried out the killings was unbearable. One of them was Raphael Lemkin, a Polish Jew and a law student. Lemkin confronted one of his law school professors. He asked, "Why is the killing of a million people a lesser crime than the killing of a single individual?" His professor used a metaphor to explain that courts did not have any jurisdiction: "Consider the case of a farmer who owns a flock of chickens. He kills them and this is his business. If you interfere, you are trespassing." But, replied an incensed Lemkin, "the Armenians are not chickens." Lemkin dedicated the rest of his life to finding a way to make sure that the law would recognize the difference. In 1944 Lemkin coined the word "genocide" and later he drafted the United Nations Convention on Genocide. The convention was ratified on December 9, 1948, one day before the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Although this convention requires that its signatories take whatever steps are necessary to prevent genocide, too often the international community does little but stand by while mass killings continue in places like Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In his role as a columnist for the New York Times, Nicholas Kristoff warns readers about the consequences of silence. "There is something special about genocide," he writes, "When human beings deliberately wipe out others because of their tribe or skin color, when babies succumb not to diarrhea but to bayonets and bonfires, that is not just one more tragedy. It is a monstrosity that demands a response from other humans. We demean our own humanity, and that of the victims, when we avert our eyes."

We hope that this series of lessons will help a new generation to understand that genocide is a threat to all of us: it is indeed a "crime against humanity."

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Facing History and Ourselves
Date Added:
06/28/2022
Unit: Totally Unofficial: Raphael Lemkin and the Genocide Convention: A Series of Three Lessons
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Introduction
Raphael Lemkin devoted much of his life to a single goal: making the world understand and recognize a crime so horrific that there was not even a word for it. By coining the word "genocide" and drafting the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, Lemkin's actions have influenced the way we are able to respond to acts of genocide. In this way, a study of Raphael Lemkin's work not only helps students understand traditional world history themes such as sovereignty, diplomacy, and law, but also provides a powerful historical example of how moral outrage can be translated into action-an example that can spur students to reflect on their ideas about crimes against humanity and their own role in preventing future genocides and promoting human dignity.

Facing History and Ourselves has developed the following three lesson plans to accompany the case study Totally Unofficial: Raphael Lemkin and the Genocide Convention, which can be adapted to fit the needs of your students. They were developed as a mini-unit but can also be used independently if students have the prerequisite knowledge to use the material. Each lesson is designed to run between 60 and 90 minutes long. Lessons contain options regarding how to use the accompanying case study text, primary source materials, and videos.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Facing History and Ourselves
Date Added:
06/28/2022
United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary--1964 Congressional Debate on Creating Leif Ericson Day
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This Google Book includes a look at the Congressional record of debate in both the House and the Senate regarding creating a "Leif Ericson Day" in 1964.

Subject:
Civics and Government
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
United States. Congress. House. Committee on the Judiciary
Date Added:
08/15/2022
Until They All Come Home: Locating and Identifying Missing Service Members
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Using resources from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency and the American Battle Monuments Commission, students will learn about the recovery and identification pro- cess of missing service members’ remains. The students will demonstrate their understanding of the recovery process by researching the location of a missing service member and developing a pre-mission report for that area.

Subject:
Education
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Archaeology
Civics and Government
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
National History Day
Date Added:
07/06/2022
Women’s Suffrage in the United States – Teach a Girl to Lead
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The goal of this module is to provide resources and information about the history of women’s vote in the U.S. Looking at the women’s suffrage movement provides a framework for exploring the changing role of women in politics and society in the 19th and 20th centuries. The history of suffrage offers an opportunity to examine women’s roles at critical points in the nation’s history, and to think about the impact of women’s voting behavior on politics in our time.
Activities and discussion questions are designed to explore the changing role of women in society and in politics. The module includes ideas for developing lessons on women’s suffrage and integrating the issue of suffrage into lessons on US history and politics, and to consider the impact of full suffrage on politics and society today.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Social Studies
Civics and Government
Gender Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Rutgers Eagleton Instutue of Poltics Teach a Girl to Lead
Date Added:
08/02/2022
The art of rosemaling
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The Norwegian art of rosemaling. Rosemaling is an art style preserved thanks in part to 19th century immigration from Norway’s farming communities to those of Wisconsin. Since that journey, rosemaling has worked its way into the identity of the state.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Recollection Wisconsin
Provider Set:
Recollection Wisconsin
Author:
Emily Nelson
Recollection Wisconsin
Date Added:
07/24/2020